Skin grafting





Definition

Skin grafting is a surgical procedure in which skin or a skin substitute is placed over a burn or non-healing wound.

Purpose

A skin graft is used to permanently replace damaged or missing skin or to provide a temporary wound covering. This covering is necessary because the skin protects the body from fluid loss, aids in temperature regulation, and helps prevent disease-causing bacteria or viruses from entering the body. Skin that is damaged extensively by burns or non-healing wounds can compromise the health and well-being of the patient.


Demographics

Although anyone can be involved in a fire and need a skin graft, the population groups with a higher risk of fire-related injuries and deaths include:

  • children four years old and younger
  • adults 65 years and older
  • African Americans and Native Americans
  • low-income Americans
  • persons living in rural areas
  • persons living in manufactured homes (trailers) or substandard housing

Description

The skin is the largest organ of the human body. It is also known as the integument or integumentary system because it covers the entire outside of the body. The skin consists of two main layers: the outer layer, or epidermis, which lies on and is nourished by the thicker dermis. These two layers are approximately 0.04–0.08 in (1–2 mm) thick. The epidermis consists of an outer layer of dead cells called keratinocytes, which provide a tough protective coating, and several layers of rapidly dividing cells just beneath the keratinocytes. The dermis contains the blood vessels, nerves, sweat glands, hair follicles, and oil glands. The dermis consists mainly of connective tissue, which is largely made up of a protein called collagen. Collagen gives the skin its flexibility and provides structural support. The fibroblasts that make collagen are the main type of cell in the dermis.

Skin varies in thickness in different parts of the body; it is thickest on the palms and soles of the feet, and thinnest on the eyelids. In general, men have thicker skin than women, and adults have thicker skin than children. After age 50, however, the skin begins to grow thinner again as it loses its elastic fibers and some of its fluid content.


Injuries treated with skin grafts

Skin grafting is sometimes done as part of elective plastic surgery procedures, but its most extensive use is in the treatment of burns. For first or second-degree burns, skin grafting is generally not required, as these burns usually heal with little or no scarring. With third-degree burns, however, the skin is destroyed to its full depth, in addition to damage done to underlying tissues. People who suffer third-degree burns often require skin grafting.

Wounds such as third-degree burns must be covered as quickly as possible to prevent infection or loss of fluid. Wounds that are left to heal on their own can contract, often resulting in serious scarring; if the wound is large enough, the scar can actually prevent movement of limbs. Non-healing wounds, such as diabetic ulcers, venous ulcers, or pressure sores, can be treated with skin grafts to prevent infection and further progression of the wounded area.


Types of skin grafts

The term "graft" by itself commonly refers to either an allograft or an autograft. An autograft is a type of graft

Skin grafts may be used in several thicknesses (A). To begin the procedure, a special cement is used on the donor skin area (C). The grafting machine is applied to the area, and a sample taken (D). After the graft is stitched to the recipient area, it is covered with nonadherent gauze (E) and a layer of fluffy surgical gauze held in place with suture (F). (Illustration by GGS Inc.)
Skin grafts may be used in several thicknesses (A). To begin the procedure, a special cement is used on the donor skin area (C). The grafting machine is applied to the area, and a sample taken (D). After the graft is stitched to the recipient area, it is covered with nonadherent gauze (E) and a layer of fluffy surgical gauze held in place with suture (F). (
Illustration by GGS Inc.
)
that uses skin from another area of the patient's own body if there is enough undamaged skin available, and if the patient is healthy enough to undergo the additional surgery required. An allograft uses skin obtained from another human being, Donor skin from cadavers is frozen, stored, and available for use as allografts. Skin taken from an animal (usually a pig) is called a xenograft because it comes from a nonhuman species. Allografts and xenografts provide only temporary covering because they are rejected by the patient's immune system within seven days. They must then be replaced with an autograft.

SPLIT-THICKNESS GRAFTS. The most important part of any skin graft procedure is proper preparation of the wound. Skin grafts will not survive on tissue with a limited blood supply (cartilage or tendons) or tissue that has been damaged by radiation treatment. The patient's wound must be free of any dead tissue, foreign matter, or bacterial contamination. After the patient has been anesthetized, the surgeon prepares the wound by rinsing it with saline solution or a diluted antiseptic (Betadine) and removes any dead tissue by débridement. In addition, the surgeon stops the flow of blood into the wound by applying pressure, tying off blood vessels, or administering a medication (epinephrine) that causes the blood vessels to constrict.

Following preparation of the wound, the surgeon then harvests the tissue for grafting. A split-thickness skin graft involves the epidermis and a little of the underlying dermis; the donor site usually heals within several days. The surgeon first marks the outline of the wound on the skin of the donor site, enlarging it by 3–5% to allow for tissue shrinkage. The surgeon uses a dermatome (a special instrument for cutting thin slices of tissue) to remove a split-thickness graft from the donor site. The wound must not be too deep if a split-thickness graft is going to be successful, since the blood vessels that will nourish the grafted tissue must come from the dermis of the wound itself. The graft is usually taken from an area that is ordinarily hidden by clothes, such as the buttock or inner thigh, and spread on the bare area to be covered. Gentle pressure from a well-padded dressing is then applied, or a few small sutures used to hold the graft in place. A sterile nonadherent dressing is then applied to the raw donor area for approximately three to five days to protect it from infection.

FULL-THICKNESS GRAFTS. Full-thickness skin grafts may be necessary for more severe burn injuries. These grafts involve both layers of the skin. Full-thickness autografts are more complicated than partial-thickness grafts, but provide better contour, more natural color, and less contraction at the grafted site. A flap of skin with underlying muscle and blood supply is transplanted to the area to be grafted. This procedure is used when tissue loss is extensive, such as after open fractures of the lower leg, with significant skin loss and underlying infection. The back and the abdomen are common donor sites for full-thickness grafts. The main disadvantage of full-thickness skin grafts is that the wound at the donor site is larger and requires more careful management. Often, a split-thickness graft must be used to cover the donor site.

A composite skin graft is sometimes used, which consists of combinations of skin and fat, skin and cartilage, or dermis and fat. Composite grafts are used in patients whose injuries require three-dimensional reconstruction. For example, a wedge of ear containing skin and cartilage can be used to repair the nose.

A full-thickness graft is removed from the donor site with a scalpel rather than a dermatome. After the surgeon has cut around the edges of the pattern used to determine the size of the graft, he or she lifts the skin with a special hook and trims off any fatty tissue. The graft is then placed on the wound and secured in place with absorbable sutures.


Aftercare

Once a skin graft has been put in place, it must be maintained carefully even after it has healed. Patients who have grafts on their legs should remain in bed for seven to 10 days with their legs elevated. For several months, the patient should support the graft with an Ace bandage or Jobst stocking. Grafts on other areas of the body should be similarly supported after healing to decrease the amount of contracture.

Grafted skin does not contain sweat or oil glands, and should be lubricated daily for two to three months with mineral oil or another bland oil to prevent drying and cracking.

Aftercare of patients with severe burns typically includes psychological or psychiatric counseling as well as wound care and physical rehabilitation, particularly if the patient's face has been disfigured. The severe pain and lengthy period of recovery involved in burn treatment are often accompanied by anxiety and depression. If the patient's burns occurred in combat, a transportation disaster, terrorist attack, or other fire involving large numbers of people, he or she is at high risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Doctors treating the survivors of a nightclub fire in Rhode Island in February 2003 gave them anti-anxiety medications within a few days of the tragedy in order to reduce the risk of PTSD.


Risks

The risks of skin grafting include those inherent in any surgical procedure that involves anesthesia. These include reactions to the medications, breathing problems, bleeding, and infection. In addition, the risks of an allograft procedure include transmission of an infectious disease from the donor.

The tissue for grafting and the recipient site must be as sterile as possible to prevent later infection that could result in failure of the graft. Failure of a graft can result from inadequate preparation of the wound, poor blood flow to the injured area, swelling, or infection. The most common reason for graft failure is the formation of a hematoma, or collection of blood in the injured tissues.


Normal results

A skin graft should provide significant improvement in the quality of the wound site, and may prevent the serious complications associated with burns or non-healing wounds. Normally, new blood vessels begin growing from the donor area into the transplanted skin within 36 hours. Occasionally, skin grafts are unsuccessful or don't heal well. In these cases, repeat grafting is necessary. Even though the skin graft must be protected from trauma or significant stretching for two to three weeks following split-thickness skin grafting, recovery from surgery is usually rapid. A dressing may be necessary for one to two weeks, depending on the location of the graft. Any exercise or activity that stretches the graft or puts it at risk for trauma should be avoided for three to four weeks. A one to two-week hospital stay is most often required in cases of full-thickness grafts, as the recovery period is longer.

Morbidity and mortality rates

According to the American Burn Association, there are more than 1 million burn injuries in the United States each year that require medical attention. Approximately one-half of these require hospitalization, and roughly 25,000 of those burn patients are admitted to a specialized burn unit. About 4,500 people die from burns each year in the United States.

In the United States, someone dies in a fire nearly every two hours, on average, and another person is injured every 23 minutes. Approximately half the deaths occur in homes without smoke alarms. In addition to deaths resulting directly from burns, as many as 10,000 Americans die every year of burn-related infections, pneumonia being the most common infectious complication among hospitalized burn patients.

The average size of a burn injury in a patient admitted to a burn center is approximately 14% of the total body surface area. Smaller burns covering 10% of the total body area or less account for 54% of burn center admissions, while larger burns covering 60% or more account for 4% of admissions. About 6% of patients admitted to burn centers do not survive, mostly as a result of having suffered severe inhalation injuries in a fire.

Treatment for severe burns has improved dramatically in the past 20 years. Today, patients can survive with burns covering up to about 90% of the body, although they often face permanent physical impairment.


Alternatives

There has been great progress in the development of artificial skin replacement products in recent years. Although nothing works as well as the patient's own skin, artificial skin products are important due to the limitation of available skin for allografting in severely burned patients. Unlike allographs and xenographs, artificial skin replacements are not rejected by the patient's body and actually encourage the generation of new tissue. Artificial skin usually consists of a synthetic epidermis and a collagen-based dermis. The artificial dermis consists of fibers arranged in a lattice that act as a template for the formation of new tissue. Fibroblasts, blood vessels, nerve fibers, and lymph vessels from surrounding healthy tissue grow into the collagen lattice, which eventually dissolves as these cells and structures build a new dermis. The synthetic epidermis, which acts as a temporary barrier during this process, is eventually replaced with a split-thickness autograft or with an epidermis cultured in the laboratory from the patient's own epithelial cells.

Several artificial skin products are available for burns or non-healing wounds, including Integra®, Dermal Regeneration Template® (from Integra Life Sciences Technology), Apligraft® (Novartis), Transcyte® (Advance Tissue Science), and Dermagraft®. Researchers have also obtained promising results growing or cultivating the patient's own skin cells in the laboratory. These cultured skin substitutes reduce the need for autografts and can reduce the complications of burn injuries. Laboratory cultivation of skin cells may improve the prognosis for severely burned patients with third-degree burns over 50% of their body. The recovery of these patients has been hindered by the limited availability of uninjured skin from their own bodies for grafting. Skin substitutes may also reduce treatment costs and the length of hospital stays. In addition, other research has demonstrated the possibility of using stem cells collected from bone marrow or blood for use in growing skin grafts.

Patients with less severe burns are usually treated in a doctor's office or a hospital emergency room. Patients with any of the following conditions, however, are usually transferred to hospitals with specialized burn units: third-degree burns; partial-thickness burns over 10% of their total body area; electrical or chemical burns; smoke inhalation injuries; or preexisting medical disorders that could complicate management, prolong recovery, or affect mortality. In addition, burned children in hospitals without qualified personnel should be admitted to a hospital with a burn unit. A surgical team that specializes in burn treatment and skin grafts will perform the necessary procedures. The team may include neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, oral surgeons, thoracic surgeons, psychiatrists, and trauma specialists as well as plastic surgeons and dermatologists.

Resources

BOOKS

Beauchamp, Daniel R., M.D., Mark B. Evers, M.D., Kenneth L. Mattox, M.D., et al., eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice , 16th ed. London, UK: W. B. Saunders Co., 2001.

Dipietro, Luisa A., and Aime L. Burns, eds. Wound Healing: Methods and Protocols. Totowa, NJ: Humana Press, 2003.

Herndon, David, ed. Total Burn Care , 2nd ed. London, UK: W. B. Saunders Co., 2001.

Tura, A., ed. Vascular Grafts: Experiment and Modelling , 1st ed. Billerica, MA: WIT Press/Computational Mechanics, 2003.


PERIODICALS

Duenwald, Mary. "Tales from a Burn Unit: Agony, Friendship, Healing." New York Times , March 18, 2003 [June 25, 2003].

Eto, M., H. Hackstein, K. Kaneko, et al. "Promotion of Skin Graft Tolerance Across MHC Barriers by Mobilization of Dendritic Cells in Donor Hemopoietic Cell Infusions." Journal of Immunology 69 (September 1, 2002): 2390-2396.

Latenser, B. A. and Vern A. Kowal. "Paediatric Burn Rehabilitation." Pediatric Rehabilitation 5 (January-March 2002): 3-10.

Losada, F., M.D., Pedro P. Garcia-Luna, M.D., T. Gomez-Cia, M.D., et al. "Effects of Human Recombinant Growth Hormone on Donor-Site Healing in Burned Adults." World Journal of Surgery 26 (January 2002): 2-8.

Revis, Don R., Jr., MD, and Michael B. Seagal, MD. "Skin Grafts, Full-Thickness." eMedicine , May 17, 2002 [cited June 25, 2003]. http://www.emedicine.com/ent/topic48.htm .

Revis, Don R., Jr., MD, and Michael B. Seagal, MD. "Skin Grafts, Split-Thickness." eMedicine , July 20, 2001 [cited June 25, 2003]. http://www.emedicine.com/ent/topic47.htm .

Snyder, R. J., H. Doyle, and T. Delbridge. "Applying Split-Thickness Skin Grafts: A Step-by-Step Clinical Guide and Nursing Implications." Ostomy Wound Management 47 (November 2002): 990-996.

ORGANIZATIONS

American Burn Association. 625 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1530, Chicago, IL 60611. (800) 548-2876. Fax: (312) 642.9130. E-mail: info@ameriburn.org. http://www.ameriburn.org .

American Diabetes Association. 1701 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311. (800) 342-2383. E-Mail: AskADA @diabetes.org. http://www.diabetes.org .

American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). 444 East Algonquin Road, Arlington Heights, IL 60005. (847) 228-9900. http://www.plasticsurgery.org .

National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. (301) 496-4000. Email: NIHInfo@OD.NIH. GOV. http://www.nih.gov .


Lisa Christenson, PhD Crystal H. Kaczkowski, M.Sc.

QUESTIONS TO ASK THE DOCTOR



Skin grafts are often performed immediately following an accident or fire, and thus preparation may not be possible. If the patient has the opportunity, however, he or she may ask the doctor the following questions:

  • Can you explain the process of skin grafting to me?
  • Will I be sent to a hospital with a special burn unit?
  • How long will I have to stay in the hospital?
  • How long will recovery take?
  • When will I be able to resume normal activities?
  • What will the injured area look like after grafting?


User Contributions:

megan
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 12, 2008 @ 9:21 pm
i wish i had a copy of this article 6 mths ago when my child was admitted to the womans and childrens hospital adelaide australia with 45% burns to her body. this article should be given to every parent who is going through this experience as your head is racing full of questions you need to ask, but by the time you can you have forgotten because you find out how serious the burns are and you go into shock.
thanks for your time
megan
Ajante
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 9, 2008 @ 2:14 pm
I am recieving a skin graft at University South Alabama in Mobile, Alabama it suppose to be one of the " Best Burn Unit" in the South East Region. The Doctor who is participating in my procedure is Dr. Arnold Luterman he has not been the best at determining the decisions of my treatment, and has allowed burn unit staff to to make the calls; in which I recently found out that some of that staff does not even have the education that I feel would be proper to have to allogate the decision in which have beeen made. But need less to say one of the Nurses changed my wound dressing the day before surgery and put some sorts of solution on my hand that cause my hand to be in great pain, as if it was back on fire! I then went to the nurses desk were a nurse by the name of Barbra told me that the solution was used because they would not prep me before surgery?!?! I thought all patients are preped before surgery!!!! So if you can answer this question for me please email me back. I Thank You Cordially

Sincerely Yours,
Ajante Baltrip
Dr.Pravesh
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 19, 2009 @ 12:00 am
its a very good and informative article regarding skin grafting.but not complete information about apligraft and exact procedure steps of skin grafting
naveen
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 13, 2009 @ 2:02 am
# How long will I have to stay in the hospital?
# How long will recovery take?
Hina
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 29, 2009 @ 4:04 am
hi, it was really very interesting article, but can anybody tell me the exact cost of skin grafting, how much cost does it. please email me if anyone know about it.

actually i have acne problem and due to that spots/skin-holes never gone even i had used lots of creams and taken treatment but can anyone suggest me if know any other treatment except skin grafting.

i m too much owrried about my skin problem, please help me. thanks Hina
Lynn M.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 19, 2009 @ 9:09 am
Hi, I had basil cell cancer on my nose, and had mohl's suregery on May 14th. A skin graft from behind my ear, and placed on my nose to close the incision form the removal of the cancer cells. The area is still partially scabbed over. I was told to start putting Mederma on the area to treat the scar. Should I do that now with the area still not completely healed? Thank You, LM
Maricris
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 19, 2009 @ 11:23 pm
My dad has a deep wound that is just beginning to heal. the doctor said he will soon be scheduled for skin grafting. is there a non surgical alternative to skin grafting?
david
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 20, 2009 @ 1:13 pm
i had a skin graft on saturday on a shoulder and on my hand how long will it tak to heal coz they told me i should come back to hospital after 6 day to check if the skin responed well,so what i want to know is after 6days how long should nurse the transplant so that it can be good again.
Sukhwant
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 3, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
I have had skin grafting on both my legs which suffer from 3rd degree burns.It has been two and a half years since my accident occured.My legs slipped into boiling water and since my surgery I have been feeling sharp pain into both my legs. I am unable to be sitting in one place for more than 20 minutes and stand in one place for more than 10 minutes.My pain feels like a fresh wound,burning sensations, freezing sensations and this occurs when I am sitting or standing.Are there any suggestions for treatment or medicine that can permanently and naturally heal the pain to my legs?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 21, 2010 @ 7:19 pm
the VA HOSPITAL REMOVED A BURRUS FROM MY LEFT KNEE AFTER MONTHS OF DRAINING THIS PESTY ADMOLY. I WAS TO HAVE MY RIGHT KNEE REPLACED WHICH HAS LEFT ME CRIPPLED.,BUT THE BURRUS WAS REMOVED TO KEEP ANY INFECTION THAT MIGHT ACCURE DURING KNEE REPLACEMENT.THE BURRUS WAS REMOVED SEPT 9 AND IT IS FEB 21. THE LOCATION OF THE WOUND IS EXACTLY ON MY KNEE COP AN IS THE SIZE OF A SILVER DOLLAR. THE WOUND LOCATION MAKES IT HARD TO HEAL. AFTER SEVERAL RESTITCHES I HAVE RUN OUT OF SKIN. SO I WAS REFERED TO A PLASTIC SURGEN FOR A SKIN GRAFT. IT WAS DONE I HAVE BEEN PUT IN AN IMMOBALIZER LAYING ON MY BACK AN IT LIFTED DIDNT TAKE. I SEE THE SURGEN TUES HE SAID BECAUSE OF THE LOCATION THE WOUND IS AT TRY SOMETHING ELSE. I HAVE SEEN BURN VICTIMS GRAFTS AN MY WOUND IS NO BIG DEAL. I NEED MY RIGHT KNEE FIXED THE PAIN FROM MY RIGHT KNEE IS BAD. I COULD OF HAD 3 KNEE SURGERYS BY NOW. MY DEPRESSION WILL KILL ME BEFORE THIS LEFT KNEE HEALS. ANY IDEAS ON WHAT OPTIONS ARE LEFT FOR MY SURGEN. SORRY FOR SP AN MY RANTING IM JUST FRUSTRATED DAVE
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 1, 2010 @ 5:17 pm
i am a 48 yr old woman who got badly burnt as a child and im still having skin grafts,i keep putting moistureiser on my burns but they staying dry and sometimes split.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 7, 2010 @ 4:04 am
hey - i dont know you buhope all is well in your life
my brother suffers fr psoriasis and now havs 70% on his body - i wanted to find out mor info on skin grafting as we are virtually the same and im sure we can exchange skin ie take of some of his and put on me and replace with my skin - is there any chance you could perhaps poit me in the right direction or give me some confirmatory medical opinion?
i would be most grateful
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 13, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
What happens when the skin falls off of the graft due to infection in the patients body? What are the next steps to take?
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 26, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
hello, I had a skin graft after being burned last year the burn was on my buttocks and my back. the one on my but was the worst, they took the skin from my right thigh. They took more from my thigh than they origanlly said. And now my question I dont know if the sight were they removed the skin is supposed to now stay covered or if I should expose is to the sun. because I am part black if it matters because my pigmintation seems to be different. I do have ptsd as a result of this. but my concern is should I keep it covered this entire summer or should I expose it to the sun. Im worried Im 5"9 and my legs are a big part of my body please give me some insight. my phone # is 858 384-6845 or send me a message please.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 13, 2010 @ 10:22 pm
I've had a 2nd degree on my breast for 3 years but i'm not sure if I waited too long to get my skin grafted. I also intend on having a cosmetic procedure performed in the future,will the scar tissue hinder the surgery?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 17, 2010 @ 11:11 am
Is it possible to recover or heal the wound appeared by the 50% graft loss after 12 days of skin grafting done on a burn case on back region.
JAYMIT
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 31, 2010 @ 2:02 am
i m 21 year old boy.i met an accident when i was just one and
half year old. accually hot milk was drawn to my hand accidently. but at that
time my parents were not in position to bear the cost of plastic surgery. thats
why they were doing traditional treatments.BAD LUCK OF MINE.
BUT mamI AM FEELING VERY abbrassed NOW. I CANT WEAR SHORT SLEAVE GARMENTS BECOZ
I HAVE BAD MARKS OF BURN ON MY RIGHT HAND.
SO PLEASE EMAIL ME REGARDING MY QUIRY.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 11, 2010 @ 10:10 am
Hi .can you tell me please can i give my skin for someone els to have a skingraft .
thank you . jen
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 14, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
my dad is suffering from diabitic foot ulcer now grafting is done but somethings were not explained by the docter by reading this aricle i hace got the full picture of my dad's surgery
thanks a lot
shane
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 19, 2010 @ 6:06 am
i had a graft done on my stomach and both palms and then had to go back and have another fullthickness graft on my left hand. it was done at cabell huntington hospital in huntington,wv. dr. farid mozzafari done a great job and has told me almost everything i need to know to help. also he has taken care of me at the wound care center for healing and done great.
natalia
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 28, 2010 @ 3:03 am
hi i ve got a tattoe on my arm covered with scars affected by removing the tattoe with is not removed yet. I was thinking about a skin graft.Please can u tell me if its possible to do it?

King rigards
Natalia
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 13, 2010 @ 4:04 am
MY HAND(NOT THE PALM ONLY ON THE UPPER SIDE OF THE HAND) IS TO BE GRAFTED WITH FULL THICKNESS SKIN GRAFTING METHOD..HOW MUCH WILL BE ITS COST AROUND?AND PLEASE SUGGEST ME SOME ALTERNATIIVES TO GET IT DNE IN LESS PRICE AND HAVE THE BEST OF IT TOO...AS I AM NOT WELL OFF FINANACIALLY...PLEASE HELP..!
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 19, 2010 @ 7:07 am
thankyou for this articale, it has helped me alot to understand what my 16mth baby will go through and has given me alot of questions to ask...thankyou x
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 21, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
Why would a skin graft done over a year ago still refuse to cover completely?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 30, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
Does Skin drafting work for people with vitiligo ?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 16, 2010 @ 1:01 am
Hi my father had a skin graft on his leg after he had a blood clot that turned into an infection. It's been two years since his surgery and his leg still looks as if was burned... He complains of numbness and lain sometimes. The skin is also very hard. I just wanted to know is this normal. And is there anything he can do. thank you.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 1, 2011 @ 11:23 pm
Hi, Very interesting article. I was just wondering about how much it would cost for a skin graph for a 3rd degree burn on the side of my face. I'd say I was pretty much all over on my right side of my face which resulted in lost of hair aswell. When I was 2years i spilt hot oil on me and some fell on my back and right shoulder. I am never in any physical pain from it but there are just some things I can't do because of it being shown. So please email me and let me know how much it might cost... or where in the world would it be good to have it with a good price? Thank you for this!!
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 11, 2011 @ 4:16 pm
My wife had a A-fem bypass almost year ago.One of the incisions did not heal at re-hab due to lack of communication between Doctor an re-hab. Excersise was give to her to do that was contrary to the healing and the incision split never to heal.after many months of pain and de-briding with 0 results it was decided to do a split skin graft on that site.now her leg looks as though she was attacked by a shark. this is now just short of a year.she is now six weeks after the surgery, are we expecting too much too soon?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 27, 2011 @ 5:17 pm
My boyfriend had skin grafting in 1970 to his right chest,underarm, upper arm area. He strained his right shoulder in April of 2010 and an MRI discovered that he has some torn tendons but not enough to require rotator cuff repair. He had physical therapy for the injury. The biggest problem he has now is a sharp, stabbing, burning pain that is intermittent in that skin graft and armpit area. There is no apparent reddness or other outward sign there is anything wrong there. He is wondering if he could be having pain from that old skin graft and why do you think it would last this long from April 2010 till January 2011?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 4, 2011 @ 9:21 pm
i was wondering if there are some alternatives to skin grafting because i have 3rd degree burns on back of my leg. the doctor recomends me gettinga a graft but it is really expensive and we don't have insurance and don't qualify for financial assistance because we just make over the limit. so is there some way i can make my scarring less if i don't get it done and let it heal without surgery.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 22, 2011 @ 1:13 pm
Where do they most commonly get the skin from to do the grafting? Thank You
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 5, 2011 @ 12:00 am
I found this info to be very informative as my son had skin implant just a few days ago and I wanted to understand more about it...
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 26, 2011 @ 10:10 am
I have a 3rd degree burn that required a skin graft on my calf, is nerve damage probable??
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 18, 2011 @ 5:05 am
WHAT ARE THE NURSING CARE GIVEN TO BOTH RECIPIENT AND THE DONOR IN SKIN GRAFTING?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 3, 2011 @ 10:10 am
I need help ASAP.. I received a 3rd degree burn, and had a skin graft done 2 years ago. The burn was on the inside of my right arm, about the size of an apple. Last night, I WAS COOKING, AND BECAUSE OF NUMBNESS DUE TO NERVE DAMAGE, i ACCIDENTALLY PLACED MY ARM ON THE STOVE BURNER, AND RECEIVED ANOTHER 3RD DEGREE BURN!!! I went to the ER and the Dr. literally looked at it for no more than 30 seconds, and did NOTHING to clean it.. he sent me home with polysporin and gauze.
HAS ANYONE OR DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT HAPPENS, OR SHOULD BE DONE IN THIS SITUATION? The burn I have now, is about the size of a plum.. not quite as big, but nonetheless my graft is burnt thru...
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 15, 2011 @ 10:10 am
HOW MUCH IS SKIN GRAFTING IF I HAVE NO INSURANCE
Robin
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 22, 2011 @ 9:21 pm
i had surgery about 6 weeks ago. the incision site, (which is below my belly button) will not heal. its getting bigger. it started the size of a pencil led is now the size of a silver dollar. do i need a skin graft? i am a business owner and aside from the fact that i am miserable. I NEED to get back to work. any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Rachel
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 24, 2011 @ 1:13 pm
How long after a skin graft should I wait before taking a bath or going swimming?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 30, 2011 @ 9:09 am
I just got skin graphed not to long ago and my arm is very tight and i just wanted to know will my arm ever move regular again
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 5, 2011 @ 3:03 am
Morning Dr.Am Tanzanian girl and i have a scar in different part of my body,and i want to come for making skin draft.But i have this quetions for you,1:Will i be sent to a hospital with special burn unit? 2:How long will recovery take? 3:What will the injured area look like after grafting? THANK YOU.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 5, 2011 @ 7:19 pm
Mother in Law had about 1/3 of her knee cap shaved off in an accident. Her skin would not be take back over her knee. Doctors are saying it is usually difficult to make a graft to hold in this area due to the flexibilty in the knee. They say she runs the risk of amputation to her leg if a graft won't work. Do you have any other cases, solutions to this problem. Thank you.
osama
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 8, 2011 @ 10:22 pm
thanks and for more subject of you knowledge thank you a lot
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 9, 2011 @ 11:11 am
thanx for the easy to digest article. i would be happy to see more relative figures.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 12, 2011 @ 2:02 am
I meet with a accident 5 years back my face to injured and my face got the accidental mark (skin grafting) at time due to my financial conditions is not good so i ignored . Now i'm interested to take the treatment to avoid the marks in the faces

please guide me regarding this issue and best hospital and any side effects if so ? Treatment duration approximately

Regards
Ramesh R
cassE
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 30, 2011 @ 7:19 pm
THis article was very interesting. I am 24 and was recently burned 3rd degree, full thickness on my arm, with others on my leg and stomach. This required an 11-day stay in Loyola Chicago's burn unit. They did a wonderful job. In answer to a few of the questions here, the surgery alone was very expensive. The donor site was very painful. THe grafted skin wraps around my wrist and up the arm, and is very tight and restricts movement. I go to occupational therapy twice a week to work on it. You must stretch it daily in order to eventually get full movement back. I also do get the sharp, tingly pains throughout the arm; doctors told me that it is nerve pain, as i assumed. Despite the discomfort, it is a good thing as eventually the grafted skin will have feeling again. However I was told that this pain can last an entire year, up until it is fully healed. They can prescribe you medication to help with this. I believe I addressed several of these questions, God bless each of you and your families, as this is such a difficult thing to go through. Take care and try to stay positive :) Count your blessings.. it could have been worse. :)
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 10, 2011 @ 3:15 pm
I had a skin graft done in 1991 on the inside of my right ankle. A wart (5mm in size) has appeared on it and I have a small infected hole about 2mm away from it. It looks as if the wart is growing towards the hole. I have seen my gp and awaiting my referral to a dermatologist. How likely is it that I will need another graft? Can the wart be treated as normal? e.g. freezing, burning or creams
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 17, 2011 @ 1:13 pm
I had met with an accident few months back.I had done skin graft on my left arm.I had been told that growth of sweat glands depends upon the amount of tissue damaged.What to be done if there is a failure in the growth of sweat glands? What will be its effect on the grafted skin?
tomufs
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 24, 2011 @ 6:06 am
hey belson, if you're still out there. i got 3rd degrees on my hand and forearm, in the process of which i wiped a fair amount of skin away leaving me without hair or sweatglands. was lucky enough to have the skin heal up beautifully within a year.
The sweat glands help with maintaining the moisture levels in the skin and temperature regulation so it shouldnt really be a problem as long as you keep moisturising it.
Hyper-pigmentation is what you should be careful of after a few months, you should always have sunsceen on it or the grafts will have a permanant dark tan.
If the graft is still sensitive to touch, i found that a hard scrub with a loofah glove gave the most intense sensation - including pain (painkillers help) - but after a few days to weeks the sensitivity passes.

hope i've been helpful to somebody out there.

Keep on smiling!

tom
Lohanathan
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 24, 2011 @ 8:20 pm
My daughter aged 16 years met with an accident and skin grafting has been done on the right foot between the ankle and the toes on 13/10/2011. she has been advised rest for a month. When can she start going to the school and what precautions should be taken if she is being sent to the school on 31/10/2011. Can she be able to perform her normal activities or should she not apply pressure on her leg and for long?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 16, 2011 @ 1:13 pm
I have surgery on Friday for a full thickness skin graft at the Andrews Institute in Gulf Breeze, FL. I had an accident at work in June, and a piece of glass broke and slid down my shin. The glass went completely to the bone and severed all the tendons. Initially at the ER, they stiched me up and send me on my way saying there was no tendon or nerve damage. Eventually over a month later, I was finally sent to an Orthopedic who had to put in a cadaver tendon in its place because they had retracted. This will be my 3rd surgery bc the wound will not heal. I currently have hyperbaric oxygen chamber therapy 5 days a week and also a wound vac. They are planning on taking the graft from my lower stomach/groin area. My concern is how long the recovery will be. They are doing this as an outpatient procedure so I will not be staying at the hospital. I have a 5 year old child who has a birthday and Christmas coming up so im hoping this will not be too long. Anyone who has had this procedure done id llove to hear some feedback. Iihospital.i I I have a 5wound year
tila
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 13, 2011 @ 9:09 am
i had 3rd degree burn on my chest..its happen when i was 2 n half years old..hot water..n my parents immediately throw me into water..nw im 28 years old nw..but i stil have scars in my breast..n my breast is not look like normal person..n my breast size oso small..can i marry?or it will b problem 4 my pregnancy..what i can do for that problem?
Dave Morgan
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 31, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
Hello I am having an area cut out where i have some basil noma cells. They are taking a graft from my leg to put over the area. I have skin cancer and have had a number of surgeries to have the cancers removed. How long does it take for most grafts to heal? I've never had one before and am a little nervous about it. Also since it will be on the top of my head will it look strange when it does heal?
Thanks from Dave in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
dainrawlins
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 15, 2012 @ 7:07 am
I got a second degree burns on my leg about two months ago and it has healed very well but i am worried about the colour will it get back its normal complexion
MELSMITH
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 9, 2012 @ 5:17 pm
I SUFFERED A BURN SOME 5 YEARS AGO I HAD SKIN GRAFT TWO SINGLE THICKNESS THEN A FULL THICKNESS . hOWEVER I STILL HAVE PAIN IN MY ARM AFTER ALL THIS TIME. I ALSO FIND IT DIFFICULT TO PUT CLOTHING ON THE BURN HAVE PARTICULAR PROBLEM WITH BRA STRAPS BURN STRECHES FROM MY ELBOW OVER MY SHOULDER AND STOPS AT MY NECK I USE E45 CONTINULLY IS THERE ANYTHING ESLE THAT CAN HELP
Unknown
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 22, 2012 @ 4:04 am
Hi,this article is very interesting,well done guys for keeping the public informed about skin grafting.
I have 3rd degree burns on both my hands,I have done skin grafting but the skin grafting still looks like burns,please advise on how would I get my original skin color back .
Noel
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 2, 2012 @ 11:11 am
My 3 year old got a third degree burn on the top of her foot right in the bend of it. The doctor has gave me the option to have skin grafts done or allow her foot to heal naturally. It has been almost a 2 months since the burn and if I decide not to get the skin graft done it will take another 2-3 months to heal. The doctor told me that if i chose to get the skin grafts done her foot would be healed in a week. The skin graft requires for them to take skin from her butt and place it on her foot and she will be completly healed in a week after the surgery. I am not sure what I should do because I do not want to get a skin graft done unless I know what all the surgery intails and what it will look like after. Any opinions welcome!
sharon
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 16, 2012 @ 7:07 am
i would like to know how to donate skin to burn patients in need and i would like to know a little more about the procedure if someone can get back to me it would be highly appreciated thank you
Dawn
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 4, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
I had three leg surgeries when I was 2,4,6. I'm now 70 year old and arthitis is setting in, however, I'm not in severe pain yet. I went to see my Doctor and he said before he would give me a knee placement he would want skin grafting done, because of all the scare tissue and there is not ample tissue under the scares to be able to have thge knee replacement.

Would you recommend having skin grafting done now, if I don't need a knee replacement for maybe 5 years? How long would the skin grafting last? If I waited until I needed the knee replacement can all this be done at the same time?

I appreciate any advise you can give me.
Ronnie
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 6, 2012 @ 12:12 pm
Hi Ronnie, I found this website and it talks about synthetic tissue transplants as well as the allograft (from a cadaver)and xenograft ( synthetic)

I hope this will help you .

XXOO Maxine
Cheryl
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 30, 2012 @ 9:09 am
I had a skin graft as a child caught my ankle in a bicycle while riding on handlebars as my Father was driving. He thought it was a piece of wood in the spokes but it was my ankle! Couldn't scream as I was in shock!

Sick kids hospital surgeons took skin from my buttocks and put on my ankle. This is over 45 years ago and still have the scar on my ankle. Kudos to Surgeons and Nurses back in the 1960's!
dave schiltz
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 2, 2012 @ 3:15 pm
in june 2009 i burned my lower leg and ankle. i had a skin graft for that area (taken from thigh). just recently i've noticed swelling in the lower leg just above the ankle, the ankle and foot. could this be a complication from the graft after all this time? is it something to be concerned about?
joe
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 20, 2012 @ 9:21 pm
Can u smoke cigarette or marijuana a week after the skin graft on my finger cause the graft already started to take and heal.
Themia
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 22, 2012 @ 9:09 am
Hey guys im a 15 year old girl. I burnt my left leg,abdomen and my behind when I was nine, my leg was the worst with a 3rd degree burn and I recently had my legs grafted. They took skin from my right leg and grafted it to my left one. All I really wanted to say was I know of the pain people who have suffered the same fate feel, so I pray for all of you,for your better health and that no one has to suffer the same. Ameen.
Igor
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 23, 2012 @ 10:10 am
Sure, race does not determine one's icnmoe, that is true, and yes the article is directed at white middle class society, that much is obvious. But indirectly race does determine how well one does even today. When people of a certain race start in a lesser neighborhood with lesser education and lesser support, they have a hard time doing better than what's expected of them. (And because of that a place like D.C. is going to have a hard time improving their education system.) Then those same people really do become a product of their environment and do badly in school, get bad jobs for low pay, and in turn have a difficult time helping their own children do better than they did when they can hardly help themselves, and so the cycle continues. When the average white person earns about $95,000 more than the average black man, you can't tell me that race does not, in some way effect their icnmoe.
bobby
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 24, 2012 @ 2:14 pm
hey im 22 and had my finger fracter at the tip and it riped my skin off too. so i had to have a skin graft done and my doctor wouldnt tell me if i could smoke marijuana a little bit and im just wondering if that would effect the skin graft at all? cause it s been almost 3 weeks now and the skingraft already started to take the 3 day so theres no more open wounds either and its been healing. so i just want to make sure that the marijuana anit like tabacco which effects the graft..
melanie
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 13, 2012 @ 7:19 pm
i got a scar that looks like a burn but it isnt.. but can i still do the skin graft?
Carrey timms
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 13, 2012 @ 8:08 am
My son had 3rd degree burn to his leg which covered over half his calf he had skin graphs from his own skin and it was susseccful. He was 15 and had very little problems after recovery it healed very nicely. He is now 22 and started having severe pains shooting through his leg he says it feels like it's burning. What causes this?
WENDY
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 13, 2012 @ 5:17 pm
MY HUSBAND HAS SECOND AND THIRD DEGREE BURNS ON HIS LEGS FROM VIETNAM IN 1965. TODAY HE IS STILL HAVING PROBLEMS WITH THE BURNS AND ALSO THE SKIN GRAFT SITE ON HIS BACK. HE HAS PAIN AT THE SITE AND ALSO STRAITENING OUT THE LEG THAT WAS BURNED THE WORST. HE ALSO SOMETIMES FEELS AS IF HIS LEG IS ON FIRE. WOULD LIKE TO GET HIS BURNS ASSESSED. THE VA HAS JUST BASICALLY JUST LAUGHED AT HIM.
georgia
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 7, 2012 @ 7:19 pm
I have skin grafts that are now nearly 20 years old as a result of 3rd degree burns, I am 42yrs old. I had 30% of my body burnt and the rest 2nd degree healed very well! Practically no trace of them only as I age some hint. I have had no trouble with the scars from my graft, only initially an over graft cut! I wore the pressure suits for 18-2years 24hrs and my scars look great, no lifting and the colour has settled down a lot on my breast not so much on my bicep. I am wondering if I could get a breast reduction? It would involve cutting into the grafted skin (my own skin taken from my inside leg). What would be the risks and would it heal like normal skin? Please, Has any one had cosmetic surgery post grafts?

TIP - Vitamin E and Sorbelene creme was the best (perfume free of course). And eat lots of veges and drink lots of water!
R.Kannan
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 8, 2012 @ 6:06 am
My 5 years old son met an accident two years back and cutoff the first digit of the big toe of the right foot. Subsequently who has undergone Osterogenis surgery for the correcting the missed part and which resulted partially. Is it possible to correct the missed nail part through the skin grafting surgery? please advice for the next step of treatment for correcting the big toe of my son.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 16, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
I WILL BE RECIEVING A SKIN GRAF NEXT WEEK TO ONE FINGER FROM FINGERNAIL TO NEAR FINGER NUCKLE DUE TO 2ND DEGREE BURN HOW LONG IS RECOVERY TIME ?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 2, 2012 @ 12:00 am
ITS BEEN 9 MONTHS AFTER SKIN GRAFT, THE DONOR SITE IS STILL NOT RECOVERED ITS IN THE COLOUR OF LIGHT PINK, I HAVE UNDERGONE MANY TREATMENT INCLUDING PRESSURE GARMENTS BUT ITS NOT WORTHY PLEASE I SEEK HELP FROM YOU REPLY ME AND GIVE MEDICATION TO HEEL FOR THE PAST 9 MONTHS I DIDNT SLEPT WELL PLEASE PLEASE HELP ME
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 14, 2012 @ 7:07 am
My 15 months old granddaughter was burnt by hot water on both her arms. She has healed ,but scarred badly. Is there anything that can be done to improve the way the scars look? I heard that when grafting is done on a young person, the portin grafted will not grow with the body. Is that true.
swazi T
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 17, 2013 @ 12:00 am
How much is skin grafting? Who is supposed to donate the skin for me? My case is not that of burnt skin, but minor injuries on both my knees. Pls help
mac
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 16, 2013 @ 5:17 pm
I had a skin graft 9 weeks ago on my shoulder where they removed some basil cell carcenoma. They used my own skin from my back and the doner site is not healing. They checked for infection but that came back negative. I'm in pain as everytime I move the bandaid rubs the doner site. Is there anything I can do?
Bina Romita
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 31, 2013 @ 8:08 am
I had a skin graft on my nose on May 21 due to BCC,the doctor took the skin from inside my ear. My skin graft did not take, my doctor wants to wait before redoing it. Is this a good idea? This morning I woke up with itchiness on one side and it looks a little swollen, the color of my graft is white as paper. I smell an odor, I don't know if it's the tape they use or if it's coming from my nose? Can I get an infection with this dead piece of skin on my nose? Please help!
josh bates
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 13, 2013 @ 7:19 pm
I was burnt 12 years ago 66% my arms hand and over half my stomach was burnt to the muscle with a burnt lung but I heeled and went on about my life had got married 2 kids but I don't sweat out in the grafts and I had tough with the heat and now I cant go mow in summer on go outside with out heat stoke setting in and im in construction but can't work the tightness has tore something in my shoulder and my skin started feeling like its on fire I feel worse than I did 6 months after I was burnt and don't know what to do im just tired of it just had baby and for the first time I don't think I wish I did so well the first decade. I have always been positive since I woke up 2 month after I was burnt I wish I would've just died and I love my life just not this body any more.
Dawn
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 14, 2013 @ 7:19 pm
Twenty eight years ago, I had a terrible accident with my infant daughter.
She sustained 3rd degree burns on her buttucks and down the back of one of her legs. I have tried ofer the years to seek help for palstich surgery/ skin grafting however the medical professionals suggested that we let it go because it was in an area that is not seen and the risk my outway the success.
Now my daughter is an adult and her self esteem is seriously affected by the scars particularly on the back of her legs. The 3rd degree burns is worst o the buttocks. we sincerly desire to help her come up with a solution which may help her get a more cosmetically pleasing look. How much would a procedure cost? and are there less invasive procedures to consider. I am being prayer ful about this. Please send a response as well as any referrals in the Boston, MA area we could consider or at least consult with to start. Thank sin advance for your response. A cry for help to heal the pain.
jasmeet
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 16, 2013 @ 6:06 am
Hi!
My query is I met with an accident and my 4 toes were amputated.
Dr.adviced me to change the bandages(dipped in saline) trice daily,there is also an open wound present(it didn't accept the graft).Please suggest me with some thing.
D. Bowlds
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 20, 2013 @ 12:12 pm
The extensive recovery time is the challenging part of severe burns.
Lualla Wolfe
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 23, 2013 @ 1:13 pm
I Have a cancer growth on the left side at the crown of my head. The dermatologist has suggested a skin graft taking the skin from my left arm above the elbow. I had a growth taken off to the right of the present growth and there is not enough skin to do this again. Do you believe this is the right procedure? thanks.
James Tubberville
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 29, 2013 @ 10:10 am
I have a 6 yr old son who will be 7 in january. When he was born he had two webbed fingers . We got surgery for him, he had to have 3 before he was 2 . He still has to have 2 more surgeries, however we are waiting on him to get older. My question is this, about 2 days ago a blister appeared on the skin graph, not quiet big , but noticeable. It is now big, it looks as though the skin graph is trying to rip? Blistering up? is this possible after 5 years? what should I do about this?
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 23, 2013 @ 5:17 pm
My name is marc and had a graft done on my groin I am experiencing a lot of pain around the incision I would like to know if this is common and what can be done some one asked how much it could cost with out insurance well my bill was around 31000$ debt for half my life but with out it I might be dead so ill take the debt
Bassanio Kuromora
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 12, 2013 @ 2:02 am
My name is Bassanio Kuromora from Zimbabwe. My son got burnt with cooking oil on his left leg and has been hospitalised for the past three weeks. He has recently got into surgery for skin graft. I want to conclude the experience that i have witnessed on my son suggests burns are the most painful type of wounds on the human body. i feel sorry every passing day but there is no help i can give as a parent except offering moral support. i wish my baby early recovery. dady.
conor
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 10, 2014 @ 8:20 pm
Ive have recently came out off hospital with a skin graft from a burn on my right calf, yestaday (the day i got out of hospital) i notice each time i put my leg up to elevate it my foot would go numb to the point i couldbtllnt feel my toes, i figuered it was the bandage ti tight , iwent to the doctor to fix this problem but now it feels the bandage is to loose, will this effect th healthing progess?
ABDUL NASER ALLAHHAM
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 21, 2014 @ 10:22 pm
MY FRIEND CHILD DAUGHTER HAS A SECOND DEGREE BURN FROM BOILED WATER.
WHAT NEED TO BE DONE AFTER TREATMENT TO BRING THE SKIN TO ITS ORIGINAL CONDITIN?
Debi
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 2, 2014 @ 1:13 pm
I was born with a bathing trunk nevus. I have had 3 skin grafts from the ages of 4,5 and 6. Where the skin grafts meet my real skin on my back hurts so bad. I am now 54. When they do skin grafts are your nerves and muscles torn? Thank you.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 10, 2014 @ 2:02 am
I am 43yrs old & I had a pan of grease on the stove to deep fry some french fries. While the grease was warming up I had to go use the bathroom & after I washed my hands I started messing with my hair forgetting about the grease. By the time I thought about it, I ran out of the bathroom & I could see the flames in the kitchen as soon as I walked out of the bathroom. I ran to the kitchen & without thinking grabbed the handle of that pan & grabbed it off the burner. Doing that caused the scorching grease to spill out of the pan all over my hand & a couple spots on my legs. I went to the ER & right away they were putting me in an ambulance & sending me to the trauma center in Memphis with 3rd degree burns. They had to do a skin graft on my hand. It's been 1 month since i got burnt & my hand is looking great but my question is now that my hand isn't all bandaged up anymore & they were able to fit me with the glove that I have to wear at least 23hrs a day...Does anyone have any idea how long the glove is usually worn? I would appreciate any feedback. Do the people Ive read about that's also been burnt, r u guys having nightmares or just smell smoke out of nowhere? I'm ready to get back to normal. Please share your story with me. Thank You.
nehal
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 25, 2014 @ 2:02 am
at the age of 9 i got a 3rd level electric burn on 36 percent of my body. somehow i survived the incident it was supposted to be a mortality case as the electric voltage was 11kilowatts .. unfortunately i live in india and my parents had limited sources of funds so i was treated in india itself. my skin is grafted and its behaviour is completely normal except it doesnt sweat however i can sense my grafted skin now i dont know what grafting material the doctor used but my skin doesnt look normal it looks superweird i dint have burn scars on the right hand and the back of my body but the doctor grafted skin from my left hand and used some thing else with it to put it on my left hand i think it was called pik skin or something like that ..now the reason i am writing this is that i am a teenager now and this skin looks bad really really bad m am a totally cool dude but this skin changes the way people look at me at first when they dont know me .. so pick very carefully what you are going to use for the grafting if you are reading this before going for it .. good luck
beverly
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 2, 2014 @ 1:01 am
I had major foot surgery 3 months ago..turned into diabetic sores.. ACell grafting was done. How do I know if this works as the sore is still open and its deep.
Alexandra.
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 9, 2014 @ 2:14 pm
I have recently had a skin graft where they took skin from my thigh and placed it on my foot, this was done one week ago, I was wondering does anybody know how long it will be before I can walk on my foot properly again?
charlotte wisani
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 22, 2014 @ 3:15 pm
I'm having bad scars on my face and I realy want to have skin graft but I don't have money ist posible to be done in publick hospital
Dana
Report this comment as inappropriate
May 3, 2014 @ 9:09 am
My one-year-old son done the skin graft 35 days ago on his neck, shoulder and chest but his wound still have pus sometimes. He had a second degree burn , I would like to ask how long it takes to recover and when he can get rid of those marks or colour difference? As he is too young to use the silicon gel pad, what should I do ? Thanks
Ayelabola Olaniyi
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jun 23, 2014 @ 11:11 am
This article is very explanatory and addressed so many areas of concern about skin graft. however, the area which was not mentioned in the article was that of injury sustained on the body that resulted to missing tissues, (e.g. tissue removed during accident at the back of the leg where archilles tendon was located for 5-6years child).
Please, kindly furnish me with details on procedure, the risks, the care, the duration of the healing process and other necessary things.
Thank you Sir.

Ayelabola Olaniyi
claire
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 25, 2014 @ 9:21 pm
Have pre melanoma on outside of right foot will have skin grafted how long for before I can walk around I'm 83 yes of age
Christabel Mario
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 30, 2014 @ 5:05 am
My sister had a 3rd degree burn on her face and hands when she was 4 years old,she is now 29years old. We want her to have a skin graft, please advice on which of the hospital that specializes in skin graft
gertie
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 20, 2014 @ 4:16 pm
Is it normal for a skin graft to start bleeding and oozing after 11days of having it done?
jennifer
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 26, 2014 @ 4:04 am
Is it ok for me to take alcohol,while my skingraft is taking slow to heal.

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA


Skin Grafting forum