Eye muscle surgery





Definition

Eye muscle surgery is performed to weaken, strengthen, or reposition any of the extraocular muscles (small muscles) located on the surface of the eye that move the eyeball in all directions.


Purpose

The extraocular muscles attach via tendons to the sclera (the white, opaque, outer protective covering of the eyeball) at different places just behind an imaginary equator circling the top, bottom, left, and right of the eye. The other end of each of these muscles attaches to a part of the orbit (the eye socket in the skull). These muscles enable the eyes to move up, down, to one side or the other, or any angle in between.

Normally, both eyes move together, receiving the same image on corresponding locations on both retinas. The brain fuses these matching images into one three-dimensional image. The exception is in strabismus, which is a disorder where one or both eyes deviate out of alignment, most often outwardly (exotropia) or toward the nose (esotropia). In this case, the brain receives two different images, and either suppresses one or allows the person to see double (diplopia). By weakening or strengthening the appropriate muscles to center the eyes, a person can correct this deviation. For example, if an eye turns upward, the muscle at the bottom of the eye could be strengthened.

The main purpose of eye muscle surgery is thus to restore straight eye alignment. The surgery is performed to align both eyes so that they gaze in the same direction

To repair a convergent gaze, the ophthalmogist cuts the muscles that move the eye from side to side (A). On one side, the muscles are attached further back on the eyeball (B). On the other, the muscle is shortened (C) and stitched (D). (Illustration by GGS Inc.)
To repair a convergent gaze, the ophthalmogist cuts the muscles that move the eye from side to side (A). On one side, the muscles are attached further back on the eyeball (B). On the other, the muscle is shortened (C) and stitched (D). (
Illustration by GGS Inc.
)
and move together as a team; to improve appearance; and to promote the development of binocular vision in a young child. To achieve binocular vision, the eyes must align so that the location of the image on the retina of one eye corresponds to the location of the image on the retina of the other eye.

In addition to being used to correct strabismus, eye muscle surgery is also performed to treat such other eye disorders as nystagmus or such special types of congenital strabismus as Duane syndrome. Nystagmus is a condition in which one or both eyes move rapidly or oscillate; this condition can be improved by moving the eyes to the position of least oscillation. Duane syndrome is a disorder in which there is limited horizontal eye movement; it can sometimes be relieved by surgery that weakens an eye muscle.


Demographics

According to doctors at Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, the most common divergent strabismus in childhood has a variable onset, often between six months and four years. The disorder occurs in 1.2% of children by seven years of age and occurs equally in males and females.

Duane syndrome commonly affects girls more often than boys, and the left eye more often than the right eye.

Congenital nystagmus is thought to be present at birth, but is usually not apparent until the child is a few months old. Acquired nystagmus occurs later than six months of age, and can be caused by stroke, such diseases as multiple sclerosis, or even a heavy blow to the head. It is not known how many people suffer from nystagmus, but it is thought to be one in 1,000 adults, and one in 640 children in the United States, according to the Nystagmus Network.


Description

The procedure used by the surgeon depends on the condition that needs correcting. During surgery, eye muscles can be:

  • Weakened. This usually involves recessing the eye muscle or moving it posteriorly on the eye to elongate the muscle and allow the muscle tissue to relax.
  • Tightened. Muscles are tightened by resection, which involves removing a piece of the muscle near its point of insertion and then reinserting the muscle into its original location. By removing a piece of muscle, the muscle is shortened and therefore strengthened.
  • Repositioned. For some forms of strabismus, the eye muscles are neither weakened nor strengthened, but repositioned: i.e., the muscle's point of insertion is moved to a different location.

There are two methods to alter extraocular muscles. Traditional surgery can be used to strengthen, weaken, or reposition an extraocular muscle. The surgeon first makes an incision in the conjunctiva (the clear membrane covering the sclera), then puts a suture into the muscle to hold it in place, and loosens the muscle from the eyeball with a surgical hook. During a resection, the muscle is detached from the sclera, a piece of muscle is removed so that the muscle is now shorter, and the muscle is reattached to the same place. This strengthens the muscle. In a recession, the muscle is made weaker by repositioning it. More than one extraocular eye muscle might be operated on at the same time.

Eye muscle surgery is performed with the eye in its normal position and usually takes an hour and a half. At no time during the operation is the eye removed from the socket. The surgeon determines where to reattach the muscles based on eye measurements taken before surgery. Most of the time, it can hardly be seen except with magnification.


Diagnosis/Preparation

Depth perception (stereopsis) in humans develops around the age of three months. For successful development of binocular vision and the ability to perceive three-dimensionally, eye muscle surgery should not be postponed past the age of four years. The earlier the surgery, the better the outcome, so an early diagnosis is important. Surgery may even be performed before the child is two years old.

Patients (or their caregivers) should make sure their doctors are aware of any medications that they are taking, even over-the-counter medications. Patients should not take aspirin , or any other blood-thinning medications for 10 days prior to surgery, and should not eat or drink after midnight the night before.


Aftercare

After surgery, the eyes feel scratchy, but not very painful. Postoperatively, the eyes are also a little red and watery. There may be some hemorrhage under the conjunctival membrane over the white of the eye that usually settles over a period of two to three weeks. It usually takes on a yellowish discoloration similar to a bruise as it clears. Sometimes there is some thickening of the membranes over the eye, which can take several more weeks to clear. Very fine dissolving sutures are used to reposition the conjunctival membrane at the end of surgery and, until these sutures dissolve, there may be some scratchiness in the eyes. This feeling usually disappears after two or three weeks.

There will also be some swelling and discharge after the surgery. The swelling is usually minor, and patients should be able to open their eyes within the next two days, as the swelling should gradually disappear.

Patients will need someone to drive them home after the operation. They should continue to avoid aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents for an additional three days, but they can take acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol). Patients should discuss what medications they can or cannot take with the surgeon. Pain will subside after two or three days, and patients can resume most normal activities within a few days. Again, the period of recovery may vary with the patient and the patient can discuss with the surgeon when to return to normal activities. Patient's should not get their eyes wet for three to four days and should refrain from swimming for 10 days. Operated eyes will be red for about two weeks.

Adults and children over the age of six often experience double vision for a limited period of time after surgery. Children younger than six sometimes will have double vision for a short period of time. Double vision is rarely permanent.

Patients generally do not have to wear patches after surgery, although occasionally a temporary patch may be recommended. They are usually required to use eye drops for a week until the follow-up examination. If the eye is healing on schedule, then the eye drops are usually discontinued at that stage. A further postoperative appointment is usually made for six to eight weeks later, by which time the eye will have stabilized.

After surgery for strabismus, the patient usually needs corrective lenses and eye exercises (vision therapy) if binocular vision is to develop.

Risks

As with any surgery, there are risks involved. Eye muscle surgery is relatively safe, but very rarely a cut muscle cannot be retrieved. This, and other serious reactions, including those caused by anesthetics, can result in vision loss in the affected eye. Occasionally, retinal or nerve damage occurs. Permanent double vision is also a risk of eye muscle surgery. The success rate of this surgery varies from person to person and depends on each person's particular condition.

Some infrequent complications include, but are not limited to, allergy to the sutures, bleeding, and change in pupil size.

The major risk of eye muscle surgery is failure to achieve a satisfactory alignment of the eyes. This may be an undercorrection or an overcorrection, with the eyes turning the other way after the operation. Surgeons aim to achieve perfect alignment, but this is not always possible. If the alignment is still unsatisfactory at the final postoperative visit, then a second operation may be required.

Infection is an unusual postoperative complication and can be treated with antibiotic drops.

Because an incision is made through the conjunctiva and muscle, there is always some residual scarring. Usually, this is detectable only under a microscope, although it may be possible to see it on close examination.

As with any eye surgery, there is a potential risk of visual loss from strabismus operations, but this is a very rare complication.


Normal results

Normal results of eye muscle surgery are an improved alignment of the eyes and improved cosmetic appearance without complications. The surgery usually has a very good outcome.


Morbidity and mortality rates

Cosmetic improvement is likely with success rate estimates varying from about 65–85%. According to the latest statistics from 1998, binocular vision is improved in young children about 35% of the time, following eye muscle surgery. Between 15 and 35% of patients have either no improvement or a worsening of their condition. A second operation may rectify less than perfect outcomes.


Alternatives

Surgery is not the only treatment to correct eye muscle disorders. Options and outcomes vary considerably based on such factors as the presence of double vision. Nonsurgical treatment is also available, such as orthoptics and vision therapy.


Orthoptics

Orthoptics is a medical term for the eye muscle training programs provided by orthoptists and optometrists. Vision therapy programs include orthoptics, but there are broad differences between vision therapy and orthoptics. Orthoptics dates back to the 1850s and is limited in scope to eye muscle training and the cosmetic straightening of eyes. Orthoptics treats muscle problems by considering only strength; it does not focus on neurological and visual-motor factors as vision therapy does. Treatment is home-based.


Vision therapy

Vision therapy is an individualized, supervised, non-surgical treatment program designed to correct eye movements and visual-motor deficiencies. Vision therapy sessions include procedures designed to enhance the brain's ability to control:

  • eye alignment
  • eye teaming
  • eye focusing abilities
  • eye movements
  • visual processing

Visual-motor skills and endurance may be developed through the use of specialized computer and optical devices, including therapeutic lenses, prisms, and filters. During the final stages of therapy, the patient's newly acquired visual skills are reinforced and made automatic through repetition and by integration with motor and cognitive skills.

Resources

BOOKS

Dyer, J. A., and D. A. Lee. Atlas of Extraocular Muscle Surgery. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1984.

Good, William V., and Craig S. Hoyt. Strabismus Management. Boston: Butterworth-Hienemann, 1996.

Roth, A., and C. Speeg-Schatz, eds. Eye Muscle Surgery. Lisse, The Netherlands: Swets & Zeitlinger, 2001.

Salmans, Sandra. Your Eyes: Questions You Have…Answers You Need. Allentown, PA: People's Medical Society, 1996.

von Noorden, Gunter K. Binocular Vision and Ocular Motility: Theory and Management of Strabismus, 5th edition. St. Louis: Mosby-Year Book, 1996.

PERIODICALS

Bosman, J., M. P. ten Tusscher, I. de Jong, J. S. Vles, and H. Kingma. "The Influence of Eye Muscle Surgery on Shape and Relative Orientation of Displacement Planes: Indirect Evidence for Neural Control of 3D Eye Movements." Strabismus 10 (September 2002): 199–209.

Mayr, H. "Virtual Eye Muscle Surgery Based upon Biomechanical Models." Studies in Health and Technology Information 81 (2001): 305–311.

Murray, T. "Eye Muscle Surgery." Current Opinion in Ophthalmology 11 (October 2000): 336–341.

Rubsam, B., W. D. Schafer, B. Schulte, and N. Roewer. "Preliminary Report: Analgesia with Remifentanil for Complicated Eye Muscle Surgery." Strabismus 8 (December 2000): 287–289.

Watts, J. C. "Total Intravenous Anesthesia Without Muscle Relaxant for Eye Surgery in a Patient with Kugelberg-Welander Syndrome." Anaesthesia 58 (January 2003): 96.

ORGANIZATIONS

American Academy of Ophthalmology. 655 Beach Street, P.O. Box 7424, San Francisco, CA 94120-7424. http://www.eyenet.org .

American Academy of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS). http://med-aapos.bu.edu .

OTHER

Olitsky, Scott E., and Leonard B. Nelson. Strabismus Web Book. http://www.members.aol.com/scottolitsky/webbook.htm .

Kellogg Eye Center: Eye Muscle Surgery. http://www.kellogg.umich.edu/patient/surg/eyemuscle.html .

Pediatric Ophthalmic Consultants Webpage: Strabismus Surgery. http://www.pedseye.com/StrabSurg.htm .


Lorraine Lica, PhD Monique Laberge, PhD

WHO PERFORMS THE PROCEDURE AND WHERE IS IT PERFORMED?


Eye muscle surgery is performed by surgeons with specialized training in eye surgery. These physicians are usually board-certified ophthalmologists and fellowship-trained pediatric and/or adult strabismus specialists.

The surgery is almost always performed as outpatient surgery ; that is, the patient comes into the hospital or day surgery facility the morning of the surgery and goes home the same day.

QUESTIONS TO ASK THE DOCTOR


  • What is the chance of needing a second operation?
  • What are the possible risks and complications?
  • Will I need eyeglasses?
  • How much eye muscle surgery do you perform each year?
  • Are there alternatives to surgery?
  • Is a patch worn after surgery?
  • Are there any scars after surgery?


User Contributions:

niraj
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May 25, 2006 @ 10:10 am
i have a problem with my left eye, both my eye balls move towards the extreme right, looking straight also there is no squint, but looking towards left extreme, my left eye shows no movement. Whats the cure for such a problem, and is it curable with a surgery. please do let me know.
april adams
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Jan 3, 2008 @ 10:10 am
was wondering if anyone has had eye muscle surgery and if so did they see double afterwards and for how long did they see double?
should i have vison theropy??
Dave
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Feb 5, 2008 @ 2:02 am
Hi,

I recently saw an opthalmic surgeon, first time for 10 or so years. As an afterthought i asked her opinion re: surgery to correct divergent squint in my L eye. Basically she suggested that unless my appearance was an issue, probably not worth it as it was unlikely to have long term results as my brain has compensated (i'm 28).
wayne
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Apr 22, 2008 @ 5:05 am
I had eye alignment surgery at the age of 5 , I am now 48 years old and just had another operation less than a week ago. For over 40 years , my left eye could not move to the left, now I'm finding out that I can actually see things through the corner of my left eye that i couldn't for over 40 years. It's fascinating to me now , been playing with this since my surgery. Before the surgery , my left eye just wouldn't move to the left ,, after the alignment surgery ,, I'm seeing things I have never experienced, such as 'corner of the eye' "visiuals" and movements of people , animals..etc.. It was worth it
Thank You.
Wayne ( coolwes )
Sheila
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May 20, 2008 @ 2:14 pm
I am 36 and recently had stabismis surgery on both eyes. when I woke up I had normal vision.
thiru
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Sep 25, 2008 @ 11:23 pm
hi
i have alternative squint.i did eye muscle correction on right eye.after that i felt double vision.doctor told that he corrected 7mm inwards the nose side and the deviation of eye is more than 45 degree outwards before the surgery.can i get my normal vision?
Marco
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Oct 1, 2008 @ 7:19 pm
Well im 15 and wondering if i should get eye surgery because my left eye doesnt move to the left but does move to the right .so should i or should i not
Cardra
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Oct 11, 2008 @ 10:10 am
i am 23yrs old, i had cataract remove from my left eye when i was 16yrs old and stabismis surgery when i was 18yrs old. my eye looks a little better than before but i'm still not pleased with it. i hate the way how my eye looks. i really don't use my left eye to focus on objects or to see, i basically use my right eye. if i want to see a particular thing with my left eye i have to close the right one. i need help, what can i do.
Nicole
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Oct 28, 2008 @ 5:05 am
I recently had strabismus surgery in both eyes. While the double vision does seem to be improved, I also had a large decrease in my vision, going from a prescription of -5.50 left and -4.50 right to -8.25 left and -6.00 right. The doctor did not give a reason as to why this occurred and I am not finding it listed as a risk factor for this surgery. Why did this happen?
DEE PARMAR
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Oct 31, 2008 @ 11:11 am
Hi

I'm 37 years of age and suffering from double vision. Does any one have any advice.

Dee Parmar
caitlin m
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Oct 31, 2008 @ 12:12 pm
hello,

i am 14 yrs and i was woudering if i should get this surgery my r eye doesnt move like it should. i tried the visual therpy when i was 8 and it didnt help i am thinking about doing this sugy but i dont no if i should do it please contact me if u think i should.
Susan Smith
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Nov 12, 2008 @ 4:16 pm
Hey guys, I had the surgery in September and it worked perfectly, although when I'm extremely tired I still have double vision(Grr!), so if you have questions please ask! I felt NO pian, the anestisa(sleep medication), is the only thing that hurt. I had no pian afterward either, if my eyes weren't red and freaky looking, I wouldn't have noticed, You should be able to realistically go to school/work within a few days, because you are very light sensitive for a few days.
Susan Smith
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Nov 12, 2008 @ 4:16 pm
Oh, and in answer to someone in the comments, it took me a few weeks before my double vison dissappeared, it feels wonderful to only see one thing, and focus in a photo, or even TAKE a photo, I'm sure you guys know what I mean!

Susan
venkat karanam
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Dec 18, 2008 @ 6:06 am
sir,i am venkat karanam i am suffering with an eye problem moving my face towards left i had for squint operation ,i had nystagnus ,i had an operation for squint but my face is turning towards left i need a solution and best hospital to treat my problem.please give me solution. your's obediently
Susan Johnson
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Feb 8, 2009 @ 12:00 am
I had an eye muscle surgery when I was 5 or 6. I saw double vision for a while but it went away and my eyes were aligned again. Now im 15 and my LEFT eye is bad again so I am going to be having the STRABISMUS SURGERY. Its going to be next month but I already have an idea of how its going to be for me since I have had eye surgery before. I know that for me I will be seeing double for atleast a week. And after the the surgery I will be feeling ill because of the anestesia[sp] ( I dont do so well with anestesia[sp] ). In my opinion the surgery is totaly worth it for the cosmetic factor. It is much easier to make new friends and get jobs when you can make better eye contact and people dont stare at you because of a lazy eye.
kamal
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Feb 14, 2009 @ 8:08 am
Hello sir ,


My age is 26 year old. Doctor say’s in my eye's have an alternative squint .But my eye's visions are 6×6 & .I have wears the glasses about 0.5 no. in the both’s eye’s. but doctor say’s my eye’s squint is very large . It is not possible to correct the eye’s upto 100% . He say’s it is correct upto only 50 % after one surgery . Please tell me about how many surgery are required to correct the alter native squint upto 100% . I want to know it is possible or not possible & I want to know about any another alternative to correct alternative squint eg. Vision therapy.


I am very thankful to u If u guide me
robinette
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Mar 16, 2009 @ 2:14 pm
i had muscle eye surgery on 3-13 they worked on both eyes,my right eye was the lazy eye but the md worked on both so that he could get my eyes aligned correctly,today is monday 4 days after the surgery and i look like i have been beaten up in both eyes but i can tell the difference in the aligment. the only the thing post op besides the brusing and swelling that is uncomfortable is the sutures,i just feel like i have something in my eye and it waters alot. there was pain the day of surgery post op and it was bad but as the day progressed it got better. i am 39 years old and this was my second surgery,my parents to me i had this done when i was 4 so of course i don't remeber that but i am pleased so far with the results and as the days go by i am looking forward to more improvement i can't wait for the double vision to go away to that is a problem but it will go away soon too.
darlene sanchez
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Mar 23, 2009 @ 6:18 pm
im 47years old i had a cataract in the back of my eye i cant see out of it but they well not do nothing for because of a surgery i had when i was a kid and now i have pain in my right and cant see out my right but a cloud when i look i have too wear glass see a little because of the pain i wish i can find some body to help me
shar
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Aug 27, 2009 @ 1:13 pm
hi,im 21 years old.when i was 12 i started putting my hands in my eyes pushing my eyes while watching tv.my father took me to one of the best and oldest surgeon ,doc told my parents that it was a bad habit and that they should stop me form doing it.when i got 16 my left eye retina started moving to left and i went to another doc he told me that the problem had started when i was a 12 and that other doc was wrong but he told me not to get opration and gave me some exercises.non of exercise worked now im 21. now my another doc told me told me i should have gotten operation when i was 16.hw told me that my chance are 60 of getting full control of eye and if opretion goes south i might see double,,,should i get the operation now?
Delvekio Batiste
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Sep 9, 2009 @ 3:15 pm
Hi, I am 30 years old and woyld like to know the chances or risk of me having alignment surgery. I found I had glucoma at the age of 13. My vision is controlable but my left eye has shifted as a result of the vision lost. I really want to have the surgery, but I would like to know if it would help me because of my condition.
dimitri
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Nov 30, 2009 @ 4:16 pm
MY DAUGHTER IS EIGHT MONTHS OLD,SHE HAS BEEN DIAGNOSED AS HAVING ESOTROPIA (STRABISMOS).I HAVE TWO QUESTIONS (1).SOME DOCTORS SAY ITS BETTER TO HAVE SURGERY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE OTHER DOCTORS SAY ITS BETTER TO WAIT UNTIL SHE IS TWO YEARS OLD.(2)I READ SOMEWHERE THAT THERE ARE DOCTORS THAT DO MICROSURGERY AND INSTEAD OF CUTTING THE LAYERS OF THE EYE TO GET TO THE MUSCLE THEY USE ROBOTICS (LAPAROSCOPE) AND MACE A SMALL HOLE THE SIZE OF A NEEDLE HEAD WITH A SPECIAL TOOL THAT HAS A DIAMOND CUTTING HEAD SO AS TO BE SHARP ENOUGH TO MAKE THE SMALLEST POSSIBLE DAMAGE TO THE EYE AND TO BE ABLE TO GET TO THE MUSCLE AND MAKE THE SURGERY WITH THE LEAST AMOUNT OF HARM TO THE EYE.IF YOU KNOW OF ANY SUCH DOCTORS IN GREECE,ENGLAND, FRANCE, ITALY,GERMANY,I WOULD APPRECIATE IT IF YOU COULD EMAIL TO ME THEIR NAMES,TELEPHONES,AND ADDRESSES.
Natasha
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Dec 6, 2009 @ 8:20 pm
ok, so i was about 5 years old, glasses since i was evenyounger. I had lazy eye corrective surgery in both my eyes, the left was worse. i didnt have glasses for about 6 months to 1 year afterwards and then had to go back to them.

i am now 22 and have found that the vision in my left is worse where i now have pin whole vision in my left eye and i am unable to focus on whole pictures. i cannot properly see out of it and the doctors keep saying that its down the my brain wirering as a child.
my right eye is not so bad but due to my reliance on that i am becoming more short sighted and often get muscle aches or head aches. i am unable to read or use a computer for more than 30 minutes before i get some form of ache or pain.

So now i have some doctors saying its my brain, others saying that its the muscles or that the scar tissue is causing the proble because of the surgery as a child. Some say my eyesight will therefore get worse or they just don't know.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Thank you
Musa H Jasim
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Dec 16, 2009 @ 12:12 pm
dear sir
my daughter is about 4 years old and have alternative divergent squint any good qulafy doctor you adivse me to make the surgery
David
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Dec 27, 2009 @ 9:21 pm
I underwent my first surgery in 2006, it was supposed to be a simple muscle surgery, my right eye veered out at times, Doc over compensated and I've been left with double vision ever since, I've returned to this doc, and many more and the theme seems to be prisms by all of these doctors, prisms don't work for me, I've resorted to patching and trying to find a doctor brave enough to try a second surgery or eiminate the vision of my right eye, I am desperate to get rid of this double vision. I'm in Connecticut, if anyone can help me please I'd appreciate it... David davtpt@hotmail.com
david
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Jan 5, 2010 @ 7:19 pm
i know what it feels like i ve have double vision ever since my auto accident 12-4-08 will be planning on eye surgery although im scared have been using prisms for a couple of months now not good anyways hope things turn out for you
Jeanne
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Jan 11, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
Hey, This is a reply to a question April Adams asked.

I have had eye muscle surgery and I didn't have double vision afterwards.

I think that you should get the surgery done. I went to Robert O. Hoffman, at the John Moran Eye Center in Salt Lake City, Utah; He has been my doctor for years, and I really trust him. I'm 16 and I've been teased about my eye my whole life. It is really nice to have my eyes aligned and no one knows that anything was ever wrong with it now, rather than just staring at me...

I hope this helped!
Kim
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Jan 11, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
Hi,

I am almost 38 years old and have had strabismus my whole life. By going to a specialist I have learned that I have had this my whole life but have been able to correct my double vision all these years until about 2 years ago. Prisms in my lenses no longer work for me and surgery is now my only option. I have 4th nerve palsy in my left eye. Anyone ever heard of this and has anyone has this type of surgery before? Any advice would be helpful.

Thanks.
Kim
valerigina
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Feb 21, 2010 @ 7:07 am
I love my baby so much if possible I would like to give her therapies than surgeries. She was born where the left eye had lesion. She started to use Eye Patching at the age of 2 months the purpose is take away the lesion, the lesion had gone when she was 8 months. If the progress was negative she would have surgery.

Again she had to use Eye Patching to gain vision on the left eye, on her first day for vision test the result was negative. She has to use Eye Patching the whole day for 3 months. On the 2nd month she went to vision test again the progress was good she saw the black line in front of her.

On this time the doctor suggested for early eye muscle surgery, my question is why dont I continue to use Eye Patching since the result of this therapy is positive? I am thinking to wait when she become 2 years old before to decide for surgery. In 1 year I am still very hopeful for the good effect of Eye Patching then if there is no effect anymore that`S the time of me to decide.

I would like to hear your own opinion.
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Mar 12, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
Kim,

I had 4th nerve palsy surgery a week ago. I was covering an eye (either eye, didn't matter which) to see if I got tired and thought I finally needed glasses. (I am 43) Like you, I had this my whole life and it took this long for it make itself known. Oddly enough, I still have 20/20 vision except for the nerve palsy thing. The doctor weakened the muscle on the other side of the muscle to compensate for the weak muscle. I have been seeing double since the surgery but my vision is improving every day. I spoke with my doctor today and we will know in about 5 to 6 weeks for sure if any follow up adjustments are necessary. All in all, feeling good, just very sensitive to fluorescent lights at the moment.
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Apr 24, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
I suffer from Myasthenia Gravis and on 12/1009 had a Thymectomy (removal of the thymus gland) a common procedure to treat and improve body muscle damage. I am in remission, yet my right eye is still a little shifted due to the damage caused by the Ocular Myasthenia Gravis. I am seeking a treatment surgical, non-surgical, corrective lenses or therapy since I still tend to move towards the right when attempting to drive. What is your experience or recommended course of action in cases as mine? I appreciate your attention.
abc
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May 10, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
This article gives a good overview...everyone's situation is different. See your doctor and he/she can recommend what will work best for you!
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May 18, 2010 @ 9:21 pm
I am a 85 yr old man with what the eye doctor calls MD. recently my left eye, the one with MD deviates to the left, or outward. this seems to distortmy vision my vision although I cannot see with my left eye because of MD.I look like I am slightly cross cross eyed and would like to have this corrected. How can I proceed to have this done
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May 20, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
Im 26,I have had 2 Surgeries to fix my double vision, once when i was 5 and again when i was 25. the 1st surgery (according to my Mum) didnt work, i ended up wearing glasses til i was 9 which ended up fixing it. My eyes started to go bad again when i was about 23 and had been working in an office staring at a computer screen for 2 years. My 2nd surgery worked perfectly for about 4 months until my double vision returned. Went to the optometrist yesterday and discovered that while my surgery did take and the muscles that he operated on are doing what they are supposed to those muscles hid the fact the the lateral muscles in my eye werent doing what they were supposed to which is why my double vision returned. I now need one, most likely two more surgeries to fix the lateral muscles in my eye. After my first op i could see straight almost straight away ... it was amazing and i really enjoyed it. Im really looking forward to my next surgery. I just want it fixed and i dont care that they have to do the 2nd op under local and not general anesthetic ... will be wierd to have the surgeon digging around in my eye while im awake. My suggestion to those wondering if they should get it done is yes, do it, singular vision iis AWESOME!!
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Jul 18, 2010 @ 2:14 pm
Hi everyone, I was diagnosed with thyroid disease a few gears ago and as a result it has affected my left eye. I've been experiencing bulging and pain around around and the back of the eye. The funny thing is it's not all the time. Somedays I have no bulging or pain. Recently, I have seen an optomologist and ge said it doesn't sound like it could be from my thyroid disease because if it was then both eyes would have been affected. He didn't really help me much. Does anyone out there think they can give me some feed back to whom I should see or do. Pretty desperate at this point. Any information would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks,

Cheryl
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Jul 23, 2010 @ 4:16 pm
Hi, I had a severe automobile accident 40 years ago. My eyes were severely damaged. I had surgery in both eyes the right one in Germany and the left one in Holland. I cannot move either eye. There is anything that could be done to centerd the left eye? Thank you.
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Aug 15, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
Hi. I am a 36 y.o. female. I had eye muscle surgery 3 days ago on both eyes. I was diagnosed with exotropia in my left eye and have been living with strabismus since I was a child. My left eye was suppressing images and I was definitely not seeing in 3D. With age, my exotropia became worse and was definitely more noticeable and distracting to me. I had blurry vision when I first awoke from general anesthesia. I had double vision and 3D vision on the second day. It was very overwhelming. Today is the 3rd day and I am no longer experiencing double vision. Just 3D vision. It is a lot to get used to at first. I am having very light headaches from all of the new sensory input. My brain is definitely trying to adjust. I get tired a lot and have to remind myself to take it easy and rest my eyes. It is definitely a process. The whites of my eye are red but one of them is starting to heal, (turn yellow). This makes me happy. I am doing regular household tasks, going on the internet and even went for a hike today wi th my family. I did a test drive around my neighborhood in my car yesterday and did just fine.My left eye already appears to be be straighter. Also, I had light sensitivity the first two days but that has gone away as well today. I went to a vision therapist first but he was honest with me and said my eye was turned out too far for him to help me. He recommended surgery first. I have a post op visit in 5 days with my eye surgeon and then a follow up w/ the vision therapist on Sept. 1st 2010. He said if my eye measurements were good then he could give me some eye exercises and vision therapy to help me train my brain to learn how to use my eyes together in the best possible way.
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Aug 19, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
Hey guys. I have a lazy right eye from accident in 1992 (it swings to the right) and wish to get Strabismus Surgery to correct the problem. Does anyone know of a surgeon in the valley area who can perform this for me, and if so, how long does the operation take, and roughly how much does it cost???

Thanks,

Tommy Phipps.
jaja18
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Aug 20, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
Hello.

I'm an 18 yrs old girl, who had an accident when I was 5 yrs old.
A very small piece of glass when acrossed my iris and it left me a scare. The surgery was successful because the doctor was able to remove the glass without removing my vision. The scare was the main reason why I am having a very poor vision.
I needed to wear eyeglasses after the surgery but then, I can't exactly remember why I stopped wearing it.

When I was in freshmen, I told my mom that I need to see a doctor so she looked for another doctor coz we couldn't find my old doctor, who did the surgery. So my mom and I told the doctor about my history.

The surgery was successful Although my vision was very poor and I didn't have any lazy eye. But few years after, I notice that my eye is slowly shifting/drifting. I wasn't the only one who notice it. Even the photographers, my teachers, friends,etc.

I remember when I was in grade school, some people would ask me "Where am I looking at? or Who am I look??" Before I just ignore it. BUT NOW, it hurts me emotionally and it really pulls down my self-esteem. :-(

As a teenager, our eyes are really important especially when we communicate. And also as a nursing student and a dancer like me, who has so many gifts to share. BUt I just can't bring my best to all my recitals or performances because of my low self-esteem.

My question is "Is there any specific vision rate/level??" because my vision is really poor.

"WIll this eye muscle surgery work??" for a patient like me, who has allergy (skin + rhinitis + eye), accident and a very poor vision..???

PLEASE help me. I've really been anxious about this issue. Thank you.
jessica
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Aug 24, 2010 @ 6:18 pm
Hi,
My son is nine years old, he got congenital 4th nerve palsy but it doesn't affect his appearance. The only problem is his double vision, he wont have double vision unless he is very tired or not concentrated. Shall I let him go for the eye surgery?

Many thanks!

jessica
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Aug 30, 2010 @ 7:07 am
i had my eye lids stiched up 15 years ago can not move my eyes up or side to to side is there any surgary that can repair the extaocular muscles
Norm
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Sep 5, 2010 @ 6:06 am
The article was very informative.
I am just turning 66 years old. Started noticing double vision about 5 months ago. My Right eye turns in. How common is this in older folks and will therapy help or is surgery required?
How can I find a therapist?
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Sep 24, 2010 @ 6:06 am
i was involved in a motorcycle crash with a closed head injury fluid surgury performed to drain 1995yr. when happend because my doulbe vision Dr.Seefield baystate eye care said no surgury needed now 2010yr got worse says musule surgury to correct mite not be %100 reccomend to Tuffs Med.center 11-10-10
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Sep 30, 2010 @ 10:10 am
I have done an eye operation, my left eye was so much "out" I was shy to take photos etc. It happened to me after I fell down when I was 1 years old. so had a muscle damaged and after some treatment, just video exercises, when I was about 6, it was much better, almost straight. However by the time it was getting worse as I had more stress, or work and muscle was "tired". anyway ... when I was 25 I looked horrible and decided to hide my "lazy" eye, by having hair in front of it (well, it was kind of stylish hair cut too!). 3 month ago, I finally decided to do an operation, it was 2 hour operation, only on the left eye (sometimes they do on both even if only 1 is "lazy"). Now my eye looks fine and I hope it won't gets worse anymore. P.S. I did it in Georgia (country) and doesn't cost too much, was around 1000 USD.
Emily
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Oct 19, 2010 @ 2:14 pm
Hi, I had amblyopia corrective eye surgery in my left eye when I was two or three. I am now 21 and since then I have worn glasses and contact lenses. Although my vision is getting better and my contact prescription has went from a +8.5 when I was 13, to a +6.0 now that I'm 21.. It seems the strength of my left eye is weakening again. Would having surgery again help?
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Nov 13, 2010 @ 12:12 pm
I saw this comment sent and I have the same condition (52 years old). i have a problem with my left eye, both my eye balls move towards the extreme right, looking straight also there is no squint, but looking towards left extreme, my left eye shows no movement. Whats the cure for such a problem, and is it curable with a surgery. please do let me know.

Read more: Eye Muscle Surgery - procedure, recovery, blood, pain, complications, adults, time, infection, operation, types, risk, children, rate, Definition, Purpose, Demographics, Description http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/Ce-Fi/Eye-Muscle-Surgery.html#Comments_1#ixzz15BhOfS12
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Nov 22, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
My husband was injured in a robbery. He had surgury to fix the fracturs of the mdial and inferior wall of the right orbit as well as of the posterior aspect of the lateral wall of the orbit. The optical nerve was not damaged and if he covers up left eye he has vison in the damaged eye but looking with both eyes he has double vision with the one picture slightly tilded.
The surgeon says he cannot work on the bottom muscle as there was too much scaring and trauma to that part of the eye and they can probably go in and adjust the top muscle. YOur comments please
and how do I get a second opinion.
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Dec 20, 2010 @ 10:22 pm
I just had my left eye done last week, and it is slightly over corrected, just wondering if this is part of the healing process and it is slowly moving to where it should be, or if something is wrong. Please let me know.
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Jan 3, 2011 @ 4:16 pm
I got a problem with my eyes probably it's called squint eyed.I can't look too far,when I look far or 200 meter's from my position then my right eye/ Left eye goes in a side,I cant see properly & it's suffering me a lot.I'm 26.Please let me know, Is it curable or can I have any surgery.
Thanks.
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Jan 12, 2011 @ 9:21 pm
i have had strabismis surgery after having orbital decompression following graves disease. The first surgery left me with ome double vision. My dr. says she can't try again as they are only slightly off. Is this true? that you won't attempt the surgury unless they are a certain distance appart? Glasses with prisms are very heavy!
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Jan 18, 2011 @ 7:07 am
Dear Sir.
i had horizontal squint in my lift eye from my bourn time .and i did the surgery for the squint when i was 22 years old . now i am 27 years old and my eyes tourned back to anather side.
so please let me know that the second time surgery will be good or not . and what can i do to find positive result for my eye.
thanks. Eng shiar Ahmad Siall
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Feb 7, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
I had a retinal detatchment repair almost four years.I had two operations.I am now experiencing double vision and was told by opthalmic surgeon,that it's a muscle problem.This is a lot of discomfort in the eye.he told me that this problem has to be corrected by a different
specialist.
Please advise me what to do.


sincerely
huntley walker
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Feb 21, 2011 @ 11:23 pm
sir i m from Pakistan. my son is of 1 and 1/2 year old and suffering through a eye disease in which he can see normal at night butt in day time specially in light of sun he can not see just closing his eyes and become so tough to him in day light and sun light. one thing very interesting that he see the sun directly normal persons can,t do this. i have checked him to many eye spclt but no one can diagnose this and recently one told me that his eye muscles are weak that why he do so. plz u tell me what is the real problem and what is the treatment. PLZ SIR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE REPLY ME ON MY EMAIL ADDRESS. I WILL BE VERY THANKFULL TO U.
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Feb 25, 2011 @ 11:11 am
I have had a week left eye from the age of 12. My eye would turn inward when I am was very tired . Not sure of the cause it just happened. I have had prisms in my glasses to help but now that I am 50 years old it is much harder to keep straight even with the strong prisms. My eye is much worse . I am thinking about talking to a doctor about surgery. Has anyone had eye surgery on a week eye muscle and if so where did you go?
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Mar 5, 2011 @ 5:17 pm
Hello!

My name is Stephanie and am 20 years old. I've had stabismus since i was born as well as a condition called morning glory disc. I am totally blind in my right eye, and also have been since i was born. I went in for eye muscle surgery 2 weeks ago for cosmetic reasons and am pleased with the results. I had the best opthamoligist in the world, Dr. Droste out of Grand Rapids, MI perform the surgery (he is the only once ive seen since i was 6 months old). I went my whole childhood and high school career with an eye that was pretty severly turned in. The doctor said i should have psychological issues because of it, but i always accepted it. I'm fairly attractive younger girl, so i guess cosmetically people were able to see past my eye. My whole life I had to face one way for pictures, avoid standing on the left side of someone or was not excited to meet new people. This surgery has changed my life. Though it's only been two weeks and my eye is still a little red and puffy, I can notice a change in the way I am on a daily basis. The first great thing was being able to be straight on with a camera and say "CHEESE!". I did notice however almost a sense of sadness recently, like i've lost something that made me unique. I have a confidence now like "look at my new eye every one!", but to people who dont know me, it means nothing because its normal for people to have straight eyes. So i guess im swimmin with the fishes now with 2 straight eyes which is alright, but i do miss having that uniqueness. I am still blind in the eye and always will be, so i guess thats unique enough =).

And to Brandon, the first 4 days after my surgery, i thought he over corrected my eye too, it definetly was wondering a bit. But after i returned to work on the 7th day after surgery, my eye started to turn in on that day and was pointing back towards my nose. Starting after the 8th day of surgery my eye has been completely straight and perfect.

God made all of us the way that we are, but unfortunatly being able to make eye contact with another person is important to us which is why this surgery is important. Good luck to everyone who all has special cases and circumstances. Take care!
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Mar 11, 2011 @ 6:18 pm
I'm 39 years old recently had surgery for meningioma brain tumor before I had the surgery my left eye lost it"s ability to move outward but I can still see out of it fine the only thing I would like to do is have my full movement back if it's possible. The problem is there's a small piece of tumor behind the eye that they couldn't remove during surgery, so my question is whether or not I can have the eye muscle surgery to correct the movement and if people with brain tumors have had this happen often?
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Mar 12, 2011 @ 7:19 pm
My son had surgery when he was 6 for strabismus and nystagmus He had a head tilt back to see far away . Now He is 19 and his eye don't close properly and his left eye goes up. I'm very disappointed I did not know he would have these problems later in life. His eyes did not close so he had two more surgeries to correct this . PLEASE if you have eye muscle surgery know you will have problems later in life and its very expensive
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Mar 27, 2011 @ 2:14 pm
My 14 year old son had Strabismus surgery 2 weeks ago this Tuesday is it common to have his ]eye still sore, eyelid kind of closed and eye inward. He is also having double vision yet and blurry.
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May 12, 2011 @ 6:06 am
At presents many people are suffering from cataract problems. There are various eye surgeries available for treating cataract problems. It is very necessary for all the patients to choose best treatment centers. Sometimes it happens that many people are not able to find required information about related eye surgeries. eyesurgerydoc.com contains all the useful information about available eye surgeries.
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Jun 20, 2011 @ 5:05 am
My daughter is 15. The degree of turn in on her eyes can be as much as 20% but not all the time. Is surgery needed or would it be a waste? I don't want her to end up with double vision or eyes that turn outward. she wears bi focals now and they correct the alignment most of the day unless she's tired. I don't want to risk messing up her vision. What should we do?
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Jun 22, 2011 @ 8:08 am
@PAM...does your child see an optometrist or ophthalmologist?? I work for an ophthalmologist and VERY rarely do we have pts that young that have a necessity for bi-focals. She is too old to patch at this age. You may need to seek a second opinion with a pediatric ophthalmologist.
deepa
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Jun 23, 2011 @ 12:00 am
Excellent, keep up doing the great work , very valuable information i liked it a lot.
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Jun 24, 2011 @ 10:22 pm
HI,
the optical nerve if my sisters eye has been cut by the doctor as it was effected by the cancer tissues. she is not able to see now, not even reflection of light in her eye. is it possible that she will see the world again... please do help me...
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Jun 25, 2011 @ 8:08 am
my name is Shehzad Raja i m 24 and m a medical student. when i was 11 yrs old i had an accident with major head injury . in which i lost vision in my left eye . also my left eye diverges a little now and right eye is normal. before the accident i had a normal vision and also both eyes in normal position.i cannot discuss it wiyh anyone else due to complex.i need advise and also plz tell me about its treatment if it is possible with medicine or with surgery.m looking forward for reply. thanks ...
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Jun 26, 2011 @ 11:11 am
the surgurt is for looks not coretion mostly ...im having mine next week
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Jul 3, 2011 @ 6:18 pm
i have the similar problem as mr shehzad raja,i had a accident where i was hit in the left eye i am partially blind in it can only recognise colors,it deviates outward,i have accepted the fact that my vision is poor to none in my left eye but i really want to look normal,its really depressing living with strabismus.Suicide has crossed my mind so many times,people always look at me funny and ave comments about my eye.
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Jul 5, 2011 @ 2:02 am
i had a squint operation last year september,but whenever i am stressed or wake from my sleep my eye is very red. And something just came over my blunt eye making it more blunt. Please what do you think i can do to this cuz i have tried a lot of eyedrops
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Jul 10, 2011 @ 2:02 am
after surgery (eye) what do you call the imaginary things one see's at the top of the left & right eyes as the the eye balls move?
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Jul 14, 2011 @ 10:10 am
Please can you advice me on what to do, my daughter is now 9yrs old and she had squint on her right her. please how can this be corrected? and if she will need surgery what is the procedure or the process we have to take to get this done.
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Jul 18, 2011 @ 9:09 am
Help! Advise needed.
My daughter is 15. The doctor says the percentage of crossing is 20%. Will surgery help or is it a waste of time? She wears bi focals now and will need to wear reading glasses even if she can wear contacts. I don't know what to do.
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Aug 9, 2011 @ 6:06 am
i have a problem with my eye, both my eye looking straight also there is no squint, but looking towards left or extreme, my left eye shows no movement. and looking towards right or extreme, my right eye shows no movement.. Whats the cure for such a problem, and is it curable with a surgery. please do let me know.
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Aug 16, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
I had silent sinus syndrome. The infection had moved to my tear duct. The doctor removed almost everything under the left eye in the maxillary sinus. Since then I've had diplopia. There have been a few times since then that I can see perfectly. I've had lasik surgery and cataract surgery so I wouldn't have to wear glasses, and now I'm still having to wear corrective lenses. Can this problem be corrected by surgery?
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Aug 19, 2011 @ 4:04 am
Well, eye muscle surgery commonly occurs in the children.But with this surgery it is a critical way of curing with this problem.Many could not afford with this new way.We may help you to find an easy way to your problem., I have prove this myself and the result was awesome. Very natural and you are assured that there’s no treat to your eyes…..Thank you and hope this helps you.
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Aug 29, 2011 @ 10:22 pm
Dear Sir,

My name is Wajid shakir. I want to discuss my eyes are going inside gradually. And i am worried about them. I want to make their appearance at outer surface. It is making my look as old. so please give me suggestion that what treatment i have to do with them.

Best Regards
wajid.shakir@yahoo.com
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Sep 8, 2011 @ 10:10 am
i just had my surgery for eye muscle correction it has been 2-3 months and am still seeing double and my Q? is after the surgery the eye size shrinkes or what or it's just me who's experienced that
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Sep 13, 2011 @ 6:06 am
Lilia is 1,5 years old. She has paralytic strabismus. The eye doctors in Armenia said that she needs Botox.
In Armenia we don't have niether Botox nor the specialist of paralytic strabismus Botox injection.
And I would like to know if after Botox the eyes can be fixed. Thank you.
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Sep 21, 2011 @ 6:18 pm
Hi my name is Rachel and I am 17, my left eye turns in making the appearance of a lazy eye. it has been like this since i was born and runs in my family. i have had a lot of people ask me where i was looking or if i am talking to them when i am having a conversation. i went through eye therapy when i was young and that helped to turn my eye inward a little bit but i am still not happy with the appearance of my left eye. i am considering having eye muscle repair surgery and was wondering if this would be a good idea? anyone have any success with it???
Ayesha
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Sep 24, 2011 @ 4:04 am
Dear Sir

My age is 26 and my eyesight is too weak right eye's number is above 5 and left is more then 6 i think it is 6. something i want to ask you that if i will be blind that what will be option for me? surgery or? and when i should do surgery ? when it will be suitable? would i be see completely after surgery and what types of surgery here? i dont know about it that what i have to do now? surgery or contact lenses? so kindly suggest for me right path please i am much worry about my eyes/
Thanks
Kd
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Sep 25, 2011 @ 11:23 pm
My son is near 14 years old. He had surgery for a 6th nerve palsy around the age of 4. Left eye would not move left. The eye now moves after surgery. One eye has the appearance of being smaller than the other. More lid is visible on the non-surgery eye. I am unsure if it is heavier lidded or maybe more recessed in the socket. I do not know if this was congenital and less noticeable when a baby or more a result from surgery. My question is cosmetic surgery? What age? Can symmetry be obtained even if eye is recessed?
kd
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Sep 26, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
How do we remove a posts we put on this site? I am unable to find a link on this page to do so? I would like to have my post removed.
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Oct 3, 2011 @ 9:09 am
My son is 2 years old and he just had the surgery. He seems to be doing alright and seems to be able to focus better but I was wondering if it is normal to bruise all around the eye to where it looks like someone gave him a black eye? If anyone could give me any information on if it is normal or not, it would be appreciated.
arnold
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Oct 23, 2011 @ 4:16 pm
Dear sir/madam
I'm 48 years old and was diagnosed with over active thyroid disease two years ago. Since then my thyroid is back to normal. And my left eye swelled up and left scare tissue witch restricts the movement of my left eye. Now I've had 2 surguries on my bottom eye muscles to corret my vision. The first surgery was not a success and the second surgery was 5 weeks later and it was good at the start but went back to where it was before. Now my left eye is looking up and the other is normal/good. Now my doctor wants to operate on both eye's at the same time to adjust them together.He plans on doing this in 6 months so my eye heals up good from the previous surgeries. My concern is if he operates on both eyes are they going both going to be looking up or are they going to be fine.

Looking for light at the end of the tunnel. Arnold ar.fo@live.com
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Oct 24, 2011 @ 3:15 pm
I have had corrective eye surgery almost 3 years ago and the muscles are over corrected. If i have another surgery what are the chances of it not working again?
joe
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Nov 23, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
When i was about 1 or 2 years old i was horribly cross eyed (both eyes turning in)or so im told. They tried glasses and patching but that didn't work. I had surgery when i was about 3 or 4 and the results were near perfect. I had normal alignment and no problems. When i was 20 years old i started to notice blurry vision in my left eye. My girlfriend at the time told me my left eye was drifting out, slightly. It started to get progressively worse for the next few years including seeing double (which im told isn't a bad thing considering my brain still is accepting images from both eyes and not just ignoring one). For the past year i have been seeing an optometrist (i live in BC, Canada) and he has diagnosed me with intermittent extropia. It sometimes happens with my left or my right. I've been using many different prism lenses for the last year but they only seem like a band aid for something more serious. He has booked me in with a strabismus specialist/surgeon who is apparently really good. He has about a one year waiting list so i should be receiving a call in the next few months. Im 23 years old and i cant wait until this is corrected and i can get my confidence back. I've learned quite a bit about strabismus in the last 3 years and my best piece of advice is to see an optometrist right away. Also take your time finding the right surgeon. Over-correction and under-correction can be avoided if the surgeon is really good.
jonh
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Dec 10, 2011 @ 10:10 am
I underwent surgery in the right eye to correct convergent strabismus at the age of 9. The result was satisfactory, but after the 30's the right eye begun to drift outwards.
Now, with the age of 60, three weeks ago, I had surgery in the left eye to correct the divergent strabismus, with only cosmetic purposes.
Now the eyes are straight when I fix with the right eye and slightly divergent when I fix with the left eye. Can this be corrected with appropriate lenses or must I have another surgery?
carolyn
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Dec 23, 2011 @ 9:09 am
Just had surgery to correct left side lazy eye. He operated on both eyes. Now my left eye is completely turned in after 6 days. Will this relax soon? I am panicking! I don't want to go out of the house! I am 53 years old and hoping for a positive result.
ravi
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Dec 30, 2011 @ 6:06 am
Hi, i'm 21 years old. Before 7 months i met an accident with spine injury and right eye vision problem. I cant see any objects clearly with my right eye and i cant read and see any alphabets. There will be some disturbance while i watch with my right eye. From 7 months i was in bed rest due to spine injury. Before one week i consulted a eye specialist. After completing HVF and OCT tests they told that my right eye muscle is damaged and there is no treatment for this cases especially for eye muscle damages.
sir/madam, please give me some suggestion is there any treatment for these type of cases. If there is no treatment what about my future. is there any chances to effect both eyes.
James
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Jan 11, 2012 @ 9:09 am
My left eye is a little bit lazy and cant look straight ( drifting outside). I have talked to my doctor and booked a surgery. He suggested move my left outside eye muscle backward. But I often feel problem of looking right and my left eye cant adjust quick enough to get straight vision. Is it strengthen the inside muscle (close too nose)better or move back the side muscle better? Thanks very much!
Joan
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Jan 20, 2012 @ 5:05 am
I had strabismus since I was a baby, in my right eye which has very little vision and from age 5 -9 had about four operations to straighten the eye in St. Michaels Hospital Dun Laoghiare. My question is Im 42 now and find it upsetting as people stare etc.. My confidence is being affected. How much would it cost for an operation? Or would I be entitled to get it done with HSE as it is an ongoing problem?
appreciate any help or advice.
B
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Jan 25, 2012 @ 9:21 pm
Dear all,
first of all, posting your complex history of strabismus etc. in this guestbook does not bring you any further, see a professional instead.
Sharing my story, I hada surgery on my left eye which squinted outwards. Left muscle was weakened in a surger with a pleasant outcome. Two years later, my eye starts to quint upwards from time to time and I am going to see the doc again. The squint especially happens when I am tired, nervous, a bit tipsy (!) etc.
mom
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Feb 3, 2012 @ 3:03 am
hi,

my daughter has got duane syndrome on her left eye. doctor has done eye patching for one and half month. but reslult is same. now they are asking to wear the glassess. if that also wont give any result. then they want to go for surgery. wearing glasses are good or bad at this age (1.8 years). is any other way to cure it.plz let me know
katie
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Feb 10, 2012 @ 6:18 pm
Hi,
i was born with some sort of tissue in the corner of my eye and it's quite visible, i'm not sure what it is exactly but you can see the lump in the corner of my eye when i close it. I've searched everywhere to see if anyone else has the same condition but i cant find anyone. This tissue thing has not effected my vision in anyway, it's just irritating.
sam
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Feb 27, 2012 @ 4:04 am
i have a lazy eyes problem surround. And also i had seek for the doctor advice that, if i am doing surgery will cause me double vision, therefore i need to know is there any other method to cure this problem. I am 27 years old in this year.
Ana
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Mar 3, 2012 @ 12:00 am
Hello,

I was born three months premature, and due to this, my left eye has a damaged nerve. I can see out of it but not perfectly. I do wear glasses but they are necessary. My left eye is kind of like a lazy eye. It isn't aligned so it goes more to the direction of the tip of my nose. My left eye has always been a problem to me and it has always weakened my self-confidence. I try to ignore it but it's hard for me to socialize with new people due to the fact of how my left eye might look to them. I have always wondered about surgery but I'm worried that if I go through it, I'll end up not being able to see out of my left eye ever again because of the damaged nerve. I want to know if this will benefit me or make it worse or if I can even do this. I'm also only 17 years old but I really don't want to live with my crooked left eye for the rest of my life. Please, help.
Summer
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Mar 4, 2012 @ 1:01 am
My son is 13. He has had strabismus most all his life. He was almost totally blind in his left eye when I tool him to the eye dr at 3yrs old. He did vision therapy and patching when he was mush younger. Even though it taught his brain to register vision in his left eye, it left him with double vision. He does wear glasses. The eye dr today said that they think he should have surgery due to the fact that he sees double pretty much constantly. When he wears his glasses his left eye stays in place unless he is really tired so this is not something he needs for cosmetic reasons. I am very nervous as to whether this is a surgery he should start now? Especially due to the fact that 1 surgery is never enough, the dr even said at some point he will have to have surgery again and possibly up to 5 times in his life. Is the surgery worth the risks? We are willing to try anything to fix his eye surgery or non. We have no insurance, but we will do whatever it takes. Please let me know what you think, or how your surgeries turned out. Thank you
richard
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May 7, 2012 @ 3:15 pm
In July of 2011 I had a pterygium excision on my right eye, a month later the same procedure on my left eye; these are fairly routine surgeries to remove a growth on the cornea. After the second surgery I developed double vision, and after 3 more surgeries on my left eye to remove scar tissue and hopefully eliminate the double vision, the double vision continues. Immediately after the surgeries the vision is much better, but as the eye heals the double vision comes back. I am told that I am one of those people who scars easily and that the scar tissue is restricting the movement of my left eye, thus the double vision as that eye cannot move in sync with the right eye. Has anyone else had this problem, and if so was the problem cured and how? My surgeons have decided that the next step is to adjust the muscles that control the eye movement. Any suggestions or solutions?
AWAIS TARIQ
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May 8, 2012 @ 2:02 am
HELO:

HOW ARE YOU I WANT TO KNOW THAT MY GRAND MOTHER IS RECENTLY FACING VERY ACUTE DISEASE ABOUT EYE WHEN WE GO TOO CHECK OUT TO DOCTOR THEY SAID THAT THEIR BRAIN MUSCLES ARE NOW VERY WEAK SO THERE IS NO CURE TO THIS DISEASE SO I WHAT TO KNOW THAT IS THERE ANY CURE THAT MADE SOME CONTRIBUTION TOO SEE THE THINGS MAIN THINGS WHICH CAUSES TENSION IS THAT THEY CANT SEE NAY THING NOW AND IF A PERSON IS SITTING JUST AT THE RIGHT AT SEAT SHE CANT SEE THAT PERSON AND ALWAYS SPEAK WHO IS HE???AND MANY MORE SO PLEASE HELP ME TELL ME ABOUT THE MEDICENE THAT HELP HER
WAITING FOR YOUR REPLY
Ann
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May 9, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
I had corrective eye surgery at the age of 5 for cross eyes. As I aged, my left eye started to turn out, I had surgery to correct my left eye, and it was basically painless. You will have some discomfort, your eye may feel like you have sand in it, but other have having your eyes water for a few days and using antibiotic drops and ointment for two weeks, it was a pretty easy ordeal. I work in a office, on the computer most of the day, I took two weeks off to make sure my eyes could stand the strain of reading and it worked out fine, however, it would take it easy when you return to work or school for a few weeks and not over tax your eyes.
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May 28, 2012 @ 1:01 am
Before visiting this site I have lots of confusion regarding eye surgery. But after reading this web page I acquire more knowledge on eye muscle surgery and their associated risks. This web page is beneficial for all eye patient visitors.
Natalie
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May 31, 2012 @ 1:13 pm
I'm 30 and have been experiencing double vision for almost 4 years. It affects my daily life so I'm planning to have the surgery in 2 weeks. I'm concerned about this surgery not correcting the problem and making it worse. Also my primary care doctor said to have it if it is under sedation, but not have it if it's under general anesthesia. I'm interested in which way your doctor has done the surgery? I'm also curious about which eye surgery is done on- good eye or bad? My doctor is doing surgery on my bad eye.
Chayce
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Jun 11, 2012 @ 3:03 am
At age 1 I had a rare cancer. Wich left me with my left. eye looking more at my nose than straight ahead. I am 16 years of ag i e. & I am fed up with being called cross eyed my whole life. Its gotten so bad I have actually thought of suicide. I was just wondering does anyone know if I can have surgery to fix my eye? Because it is not genetic, please I need help. If you have any clue what Ican do. Please don't hesitate to contact me. andersonchayce@yahoo.com
cathy
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Jul 11, 2012 @ 10:22 pm
I'm 38 years old and when I was 5 I had eye surgery and it fixed my lazy eye and in the last couple of years it has started again so I went and seen an eye doctor and I ask him if I could fix it again and he said he wouldn't recommend it because my nerve to my lazy eye is dead that I am legally blind in that eye so without being able to do the exercises it wouldn't stay but I can see colors in that eye I just want to know if you think what he does that it can't be fixed
parminder
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Jul 16, 2012 @ 7:07 am
i am 19 year old boy . i have deviated nasal septum surjery in jan 2012.after surjery my both the black eye ball position move from centre .my eye looks dull .i have also a problem of far eye sight.some time i have pain i my eyes.how can it treat.
Trina
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Jul 18, 2012 @ 11:23 pm
Who all has got the surgery , I have had a lazy eye ever since I was born , and have been wearing glasses from age % to the age i am know 16 . I went to the eye drs the other day and they had told me after 11 years of wearing glass , the glasses would not help my lazy eye due to me not being able to see out of my left eye at all . Does any one know if the surgery is a good eye , just trying to get other opions , this lazy eye has finnaly gotten old !Please let me know your stories im actually making an appointment with Dr. Fishmen in Louisville , to see what I can get done , would appretiate your alls opion and stories .
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Aug 6, 2012 @ 11:23 pm
Hello I am from England I had a eye muscle surgery in febuary 1st 2012 I had pain for 2 weeks and my eyes were red for 3 months after 3 months when I can see my eye I saw that by having eye muscle operation my eyes r the same I still got the squint I am afraid that I have to have it again I have to wait till next summer now because I didn't go out for 2 months my age is 17. I am very sad because I can't communicate properly and it ruins my social life shall I have it again?
Alyssa
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Aug 16, 2012 @ 1:13 pm
Hi, my name is Alyssa and I am 15 years old, I am completely blind in my left eye and from time to time it goes lazy. I really want help to fix it and don't know where to go to. My self confidence has gone down and I hate modeling now. I really need help:/ please?
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Aug 30, 2012 @ 11:23 pm
Hello my name is Kayla and I am 19 yrs old, Igrew up blind in my right eye and it was lazy and turned outwards. I didn't let my lazy eye hold me back tho I still had lot of friends, I played sports, had boyfriends and even did pageants! Even tho I still lived my life there was still that little part of me that wanted my eyes to be fixer( most ppl didn't even know I had a lazy eye tho I was good st hiding it and those who did forgot all about it!) ... I did do eye patches as a kid but they didn't seem to work, after a while doctors just gave up.. everytime I went to the eye doctor they wouldn't try to help or suggest any advice to help my eye(I hate them). However I did manage to find a doctor who specializes in adult lazy eye ! I had surgery just 3weeks ago !! The surgery was about a 4 hr process and my eye only hurt a week afterwards, my eye is still a little red but it is gettingbetter everyday and my eye is straight! The doctor said that it should stay that way so fingers crossed it does!! So if anyone wants the surgery I say do it!!! Now im even more confident and u will be too! If anyone has any questions are would just like some help with ur confidence please send me anemail! :)
mishu
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Sep 26, 2012 @ 12:12 pm
hi,my name is mishu and i am 30 years old,i have a recent squint eye surgery(15days ago).when can i go back to my office??i am architect that's why i need to sit infront of computer for 8 hours everyday in office,is it safe for my eye condition?
Carrie
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Oct 10, 2012 @ 5:17 pm
My son is 21 and has had lazy eye for quite a few years, but did not notice as small child. We are considering the muscle surgery, but of course we are scared. He is seeing double vision, mostly while driving at night. That is why he wants to do it. We saw Dr. Dennis Anderson from Marshfield WI. Anyone aware of him or had surgery performed by him? Going to get another opinion at another medical center in town. Dr. Simons at St. Mikes in Stevens Point. Anyone have it performed by him? Hard to decide what to do.
parminder
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Oct 12, 2012 @ 10:10 am
i had a septoplasty and turbinate reduction nose surjery last year to unblocked the nose and reduce breathing problem.after that surjery my right eye look lazy and turned little out upward and my left eye aslo turned little outward .i cannot see in sunlight with full open eyes .when i see any thing my eyes not focusing in middle object.when i see my face in mirror i saw that my eyes are not strait .i am a student i feel shame when i stands with my friend and communicate with other person .even in photo my eyes look lazy and worst.i had some vision problem but i am wearing glasses .how my eyes be strait .please give me answer for better treatment.i hope that you can reply me.
Suzi-X
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Oct 15, 2012 @ 7:19 pm
I had eye muscle surgery June 1st 2012 and cosmetically I look fine and all went well with surgery. My visual fusion was a 50 and now has been reduced to a 6 which is almost perfect. My left eye was severely turned in and my right eye slightly, she left me inward slightly in both eyes to reduce the risk of double vision. I am 4 months post op and I had to leave my job because I cannot operate on a computer for more than 4 hours. It has gotten better since surgery and my surgeon considers that a plus, but I am feeling like I will never be able to fulfill my job responsibilities again and I am feeling like something may have gone wrong. Right after surgery I was only able to look at a computer for 15 minutes before horrific migraines and throwing up set in. Now the migraines have stopped but I still get some eye strain and I can only make it 4 hours. My whole life has changed and I am depressed for having to make job changes that are leaving me with less than satisfactory pay. I just hope this is temporary and I will be able to work again in my field. Other than this all is well with the surgery and cosmetic outcome. No one knows why I am having this, I just pray it keeps getting better and I can be happy overall with everything.
Sheila Hughbanks
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Oct 26, 2012 @ 6:18 pm
I had thyroid opthomology caused from Graves Disease. Tha is hyper thyroid disease. My eyes were bulging and red and I saw double. I went to a surgeon who did Decompression surgey. This basically put my eyes in a different socket. I looked better, and no more bulging eyes. I than went to a doctor who did eye muscle surgery to try and corrrect the double vision. I still had to wear prism glasses and could see fine. That was 16 years ago, and my right eye is crooked, looking down. I am looking forward to getting it done in 3 weeks, as I can't hardly see out of my right eye. Reading these e-mails have helped me for what to expect after surgery for pain and vision.
autumn
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Nov 1, 2012 @ 1:01 am
This has been enlightening reading other peoples experiences. I had a motorcycles accident 18 months ago and swelling in my brain caused damage to my 6th cranial nerve. Since then i have had severe double vision. My right eye turns in. I am having eye muscle surgery next week on 2 or more muscles. I am quite whorried about going blind in that eye as doctor said operating on more than thie one muscle may cut off blood supply to the eye. Has this happened to anyone else after the surgery?
ana
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Nov 15, 2012 @ 10:22 pm
Does anyone know how much cost the surgery for children 6 years old? For nystagmus and I think it is called the null position... And if anyone had this kind of surgery I would like to hear it please, thanks
laser eye surgery
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Jan 2, 2013 @ 1:13 pm
This is very good website and very informative, really very helpful.
jason mccathern
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Jan 7, 2013 @ 11:11 am
Yes I have had double vision for 10years now after having a tbi although have had surgery to repair my double vision but,it didn't work. And so I'm desperately seeking a opthamoligist or eye surgeon to observe and hopefully get back to seeing normal t,y so much if can direct me to a eye doctor.
robert crabbs
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Feb 11, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
My wife has an issue where she cant ware class's her eyes have small bit of movement all the time, something to do with the muscles I believe. Could u tell me what this is an can it be treated? Thank you Robert


'
Clifford Anson
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Feb 23, 2013 @ 10:10 am
My 5year old son just had both eye's done i am hoping that it will help a little because his vison is 20/200 in both eye's with glasses on he is seeing duble right now he looks a little crosseyed right now i am keeping my fingers crossed that it will help him a little to focces better
DAve
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Apr 2, 2013 @ 10:22 pm
Hi,
First off, what an interesting post I stumbled upon. I am a 48 year old male who has had a "lazy eye" his entire life. I was born premature by 2 months. I was told I was born "cross-eyed", and that I had eye surgery at 6 months to correct my crossed eyes. I have worn glasses (contacts) all my life, and continue to wear them now.
My right eye - as the optometrist calls it - is known as the "lazy eye". My right eye turns outward. I've tried - hard as it may be - to act normal like the staring doesn't bother me. I dread having to look "into" a camera lens for a picture. It's downright embarrassing to see the picture, only to see myself staring somewhere into space! Over the years I've compensated and have learned "how" to take a normal picture. I literally have to look to the left of the camera (as it points toward me) so my right eye can be somewhat aligned. The other day I was having a conversation with another person. I was sitting; the other person was standing about 5' away from me. I tend to look into the other person's eyes (my left eye to their right eye, and vice versa). So, when I was talking I guess my right eye was looking somewhere "past" the other person's left eye. How embarrassing it was for me when he turned to look over his left shoulder (because he didn't know where I was looking!) I could have crawled up into a little ball (and I'm 47 years old!!)
To all of us that have any eye condition; I have empathy for you. It's not easy dealing with "lazy eye", etc. My wife and I purchased our first ever 3D LED TV about 1 year ago. My daughter and my wife enjoy watching Blu-Ray movies in 3D. Me... well... I watch the movie (with the glasses - they hurt my vision) but in 2D. We went to Disneyland last September (2012) and went on several 3D rides. While my wife and daughter were having the time of their lives (Transformers at Universal was incredible, even for me), I was left videoing the rides while I watched them in 2D.
I suppose I can't miss what I have never known. Still... being able to see just one vision would be so nice. Because of my condition, I have double vision. For me, the vision in my right eye is just to the left of the vision in my left eye. Most of the times my brain compensates by "blocking out" the right eye. I wear glasses (contacts) in both eyes. I have very poor vision in my right eye. Though the vision is my right eye is clear and sharp, I cannot focus in on a pin-head, etc. I have no idea where the "centre" of an object is. I just think I have some blind spots in my eye.
Dave
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Apr 2, 2013 @ 10:22 pm
Whoops! I hit the "Send" button by accident. LOL. (I'm not done!)
I have discussed my condition with more than one eye doctor. They just say I could end up with permanent (?) double vision. Heck... what do I have to lose.. I have double vision now.

I consider myself to be a tough guy...one with a thick skin. But all that goes away when I'm having a conversation with somebody and just know my right eye is off in la-la land. I know I can compensate by looking away (with my left eye) so my right eye is in alignment (if you know what I mean), but the problem with that is I am not directly looking at the person (with my left eye... and my right eye is useless for focusing).

As I write this I am becoming choked up with emotion. I felt I was one in a million with my eye problems. It's so nice to know I am not alone. I feel embarrassed that at 47 I can get emotional with my "lazy eye".

I did some research and have located a Doctor where I live that may be able to help me gain some balance in my life. Not sure whether my condition can be fixed (by surgery or other means) but I am ready to take the next step. I told my wife I would like to have eye surgery to fix my lazy eye...trouble is I think it's more than just a lazy eye.

People - we stand together. There are more like us than I ever knew. I am so proud of everyone that has posted here. It takes great courage to open up to strangers. God bless. If nothing else at least I was able to post here and at least get it off my chest.
Dave
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Apr 2, 2013 @ 10:22 pm
Sorry...me again. I re-read my previous posts and see I have some discrepancies on my age. I am currently 47 years old...turning 48 in November. Gosh... did I forget how old I am.
Madeleine
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Apr 9, 2013 @ 12:12 pm
Is there help for someone has dameage to the eye muscles from stroke. Thank you
Nancy
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Apr 29, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
My son is 5 years old and had strabismis surgery in both eyes. One eye has healed up fine but the other is hemmoraging with blood all over the white of the eye. It looks awful but the doctor says it is normal anybody else have this problem with the surgery.
Sathish
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May 20, 2013 @ 8:08 am
My daughter is 3 years old. She has some problem with her eye which we noticed very recently. When she moves her eye ball left to right or right to left her eye ball doesn't moves in a proper alignment. But this is not occurring all the time. Very rarely am finding this. I am bit worried if it'll be a problem in her later stage.? Should we need to do any surgery.? or any exercise will cure this issue. Please advise me. Thanks in advance.
baz
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Jun 10, 2013 @ 11:23 pm
I am 38 and having eye muscle surgery next week on the right eye. I have always had lazy eye but it had never been properly diagnosed and i lost 3d vision since around 6-7 years of age. While i learned to compensate for basic activities, I have always had difficulty with athletics since i could never focus on a football or baseball while in flight. I have also never been able to look anybody straight in the eye since my eyes crossed in. For the last few years however, The problem has become exponentially worse. I cannot drive, read, work or at times think clearly because of eye strain, headaches, and fatigue. It is important for all to actually find out the origin of this issue within themselves rather than just treat the symptoms, thinking that is the end.

In my case, I have learned that I have had a neurological issues since childhood and the "lazy eye" was just one manifestation of a much bigger problem; an effect rather than a cause of my other issues. I have dyslexia, a kind of "lazy brain" syndrome, although i can assure you that as someone with a masters degree in finance my brain has hardly been "lazy". I am dealing with some symptoms of dementia at the moment ( memory loss, inability to think critically or keep focus on a thought. Loss of words when speaking and/or writing) and as I age i worry that it might lead into something much worse and that i may not even be able to take care of myself. I lost my job five years ago and have been unable to find work since so this operation is coming out of my already empty pockets with only hope of some relief as a reward.

I urge everybody to have their vision problems and lazy eye evaluated as early as possible and in conjunction with a visit to a neurologist to find our the reasons for the lazy eye. Parents, please don't take some eye crossings in your child lightly and laugh it off as an amusing joke like my parents did with me. It can potentially ruin your child's future and all hope for a normal life

good luck to all
KR
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Jun 25, 2013 @ 12:00 am
Hello, I am 17 years old & I've always had a lazy eye or what people consider "cock-eyed" I have suffered this my suffered from this my whole life. I had surgery once as a baby & then I had it again when I was about 7 or 8. It has always been hard for me to make friends because people always make fun of me or they say "are you cock-eyed?" I was once talking to this guy I really like & he said it looked like my eye was lazy. I just turned & walked away. Also, as a child in Elementary school kids would always make fun of me. I never told my mom because she would only go to my school & matters worse. I love myself & I don't exactly have low self-esteem because I'm a very beautiful person inside & out. I just have an eye problem. I recently went to my doctor & I'm having strabismus surgery for the third time in 2 months. Since I have prom, graduation & etc. Coming up I'm so excited yet nervous for this procedure. Even though i had it done around 7 or 8 years it's like I tried to erase that out of my mind. The surgery was actually great & it worked all the way until I was about 14 & my eye started drifting back outward. PARENTS if you have younger or even kids my age with this problem PLEASE get it fixed. My eyes are the reason ihavent had a job interview, successful relationships with others (think I have something to hide BC I won't look them in the eyes) & also the reason why I never tried out for anything in school. KIDS ARE SO CRUEL & hurtful,, so please don't let your kids suffer.
Julie
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Jun 25, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
Hi, I am 52 years old and I was born with only 3 muscles on my left eye. My eye will not turn to the far left side of my eye. My right eye over compensates for this and I turn my head to be able to see correctly, which makes me look strange to others. I too, have had this problem all my life and it has altered my life in many negitive ways. As I've grown older and my eye sight has changed, (like normal older peoples eyes change) I'm having trouble seeing with triocals. My Dr. said I should see a Ophthalmologist about Strabismus Surgery. I'm worried I might be worse off if I have the surgery. I need some help making a good decision.
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Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:22 pm
I am 32 and just had eye muscle surgery less than a week ago, my eyes now look perfect!! I had surgery as an infant and was over corrected (for strabismus) so my right eye went outward and a little up. I never got double vision at all had some pain and swelling for about 3 days. I am still super red and in the healing process but am thrilled with the alignment should have had this done a long time ago!!! I am experiencing some pretty bad headaches as I adjust but we'll worth it i think!!! Dr. Jane Hughes from Washington, PA is absolutely wonderful, couldn't ask for a better dr/ surgeon!!! She specializes in adult strabismus.
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Jul 28, 2013 @ 6:18 pm
I'm a 42 yo woman living in London. I'm having an eye op on 30 August to better my intermittent exotropia on both eyes. I have had my squints (outward and upward eye drifts) since I was a toddler and can only sympathise with everyone in this long link. It has always been cause of much upset and embarrassment. People young and old can be very insensitive. I have had all the usual problems; people looking over their shoulders to see "who is she talking to?", people at parties saying "Goshh sweetie, you must be so drunk; your eyes are all over the place!" My little niece saying "hmm auntie...your eyes are funny". I don't like looking strangers straight into the eyes out of fear I'll be squinting. I don't like posing for photographs. I never flirted with a guy in a bar when I was younger - imagine thinking you're sending a sultry gaze across the bar only to realise your eyes have turned different directions. People who know me always say "but we don't ever notice" - but I'm sure they do.
I went to a specialist when I was 18 - only to be told to forget about an operation as I "would only end up with double vision" and why would a pretty girl like me care about something so trivial "it's not as if you squint all the time"!!! It has taken me over 20 years to seek another opinion. I wish I had done that years ago. I went to the best eye hospital in the World (Moorfields in London). They tested me for 2 hours (eg to see IF there's a chance you could develop double vision!) and told me they can make it a lot better - if not fix it completely. Please feel free to email me with questions! x
Mette
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Jul 28, 2013 @ 6:18 pm
Forgot to say: I also found out that my squints were the reason I never 'got' the whole 3D cinema experience. Having sat through a couple of frustrating films I now understand why I wasn't impressed :) :)
Anurag
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Aug 12, 2013 @ 12:12 pm
Sir,
I am 19 years old and have duane's sydrome, retraction type 1 in right eye. I also have enophthalmos in that eye, though very slight. My girlfriend broke up with me for it, felt worst for it. Is there any surgery that can reduce atleast enophthalmos? My eyes looks more weird when I see towards left side and my left eye appears bigger and out and right eye moves inside, so appears small.
Cindy
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Aug 20, 2013 @ 9:21 pm
A million thanks for your website - next Monday I have surgery and by far your website relieved my fears and explained the process better that even my Ophthalmologist did! I appreciate you.
sue
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Oct 21, 2013 @ 3:15 pm
IM 39YRS. OLD AND THINKING ABOUT HAVING SURGERY BY DR AJAY SONI AT HERSHEY MEDICAL CENTER I HERSHEY PA. DID ANYONE HAVE A GOOD OR BAD COMMENT ABOUT HIM WOULD BE INTERESTED IN HEARING IF SO?
Jerry
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Nov 22, 2013 @ 6:06 am
I am 41 year old adult. I just developed this in last 2 years. I had the surgery about 8 days ago. Dr william Gold in Orlando. I still have double Vision. He said it takes a sometimes several weeks. The eye is finally clearing up. The double vision is showing some improvement. I just hope I do not need another surgery.
Brian
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Dec 13, 2013 @ 11:23 pm
curiosity.
If an eye muscle is lost during surgery, is there a way to fix it?
If not, what kind of time frame are we looking at before this tech is possible?
Being lost, does it disintegrate when not being used?
Would we be able to use stem cell research to create new muscles of the eye?
If we were able to re-create the eye muscle, would the nerve used to control it be forever lost?
What is the average time it takes for an eye to regain sight after being turned back on by brain due to eye realignment?
What are the chances that an eye will not regain operation after being realigned?
If the procedure of finding or recreating the muscle exists, what is the average cost?
What do you think the projected cost would be in the future if it is not available now?
Thank you for any answers provided! :)
Debs
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Jan 14, 2014 @ 4:16 pm
Hi, I'm 32yrs old and have suffered from double vision for 2 & half years now (I did not have this as a child) and wear prisms in my glasses to correct my vision. Last year I got Botox injected into one eye; it took 6weeks before I could see properly! At first it was terrible, it was like I was drunk all the time :( then I got used to the dizziness etc but could not drive for the 6weeks. My vision was great after that for 8weeks, I could wear my contact lenses again :) but after 10weeks the Botox had worn off and I was back in glasses with prisms :( I am getting married in June 2014 & have been back to Consultant, he has suggested surgery as an option or Botox again; I have no idea what to do?? If I have surgery will I be healed in time for my wedding? Or if I get Botox will I have 6weeks of hell again?? :( for something that is not a permanent cure?
andrew pham
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Jan 14, 2014 @ 11:23 pm
I am 29 years old and I have double vision for about a year now. It only started a year ago. I have tried eye therapy for the last 4 months. I have shown little improvement but I still see double. I do wear prisms. I would like to wear contacts again. I don't like taking photos because I look crossed eyed. I only see double when I see far. I am thinking about surgery.
Chris
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May 27, 2014 @ 1:01 am
Hi Guys,

I am 25 and recently been diagnosed with Fourth Nerve Palsy. My Doc explained it is rare for someone my age to suddenly develop this condition. I played soccer and I am goalkeeper so typically I will get a head knock here and there. I remember getting a ball to the head about a year ago. Slowly after this occurrence I remember struggling with the lights. As months passed it got worse. One year on I saw my doc and he has although prisms will do the job surgery is def an option. The only problem I am might be facing is the face that typically if this is a result of an injury the symptoms should start right away and not develop. Mine however has developed over time. I recently got a blood test to see if it isn't some kind of muscle condition..hopefully not.

Anyway just thought I would share.

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