Arthrography





Definition

Arthrograpy is a procedure involving multiple x rays of a joint using a fluoroscope, a special piece of x-ray equipment that shows an immediate x-ray image. A contrast medium (in this case, a contrast iodine solution) injected into the joint area helps highlight structures of the joint.


Purpose

Frequently, arthrography is ordered to determine the cause of unexplained joint pain. This fluoroscopic procedure can show the internal workings of specific joints and outline soft tissue structures. The procedure may also be conducted to identify problems with the ligaments, cartilage, tendons, or the joint capsule of the hip, shoulder, knee, ankle, wrist, or other joints. An arthrography procedure may locate cysts in the joint area, evaluate problems with the joint's arrangement and function, indicate the need for joint replacement, or show problems with existing joint replacement (prostheses). The most commonly studied joints are the knee and shoulder.


Description

Arthrograpy may be referred to as "joint radiography" or "x rays of the joint." The term arthrogram may be used interchangeably with arthrography. The joint area will be cleaned and a local anesthetic will be injected into the tissues around the joint to reduce pain. Next, if fluids are present in the joint, the physician may suction them out (aspirate) with a needle. These fluids may be sent to a laboratory for further study. Contrast agents are then injected into the joint through the same location by attaching the aspirating needle to a syringe containing the contrast medium. The purpose of contrast agents in x-ray procedures is to help highlight details of areas under study by making them opaque. Agents for arthrography are generally air- and water-soluble dyes, the most common containing iodine. Air and iodine may be used together or independently. After the contrast agent is administered, the site of injection will be sealed, and the patient may be asked to bend and flex the joint to distribute the contrast.

Before the contrast medium can be absorbed by the joint itself, several films will be quickly taken under the guidance of the fluoroscope. The patient will be asked to move the joint into a series of positions, keeping still between positioning. Sometimes, the patient will experience some tingling or discomfort during the procedure, which is normal and due to the contrast. Following fluoroscopic tracking of the contrast, standard x rays of the area may also be taken. The entire procedure will last about one hour.

Generally, a joint is evaluated first by MRI ( magnetic resonance imaging ) instead of an arthrogram, or by MRI combined with the arthrogram. Gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent, is injected if the arthrogram is performed as part of an MRI procedure. If the arthrogram is performed as part of a MRI arthrogram, the MRI scan will then be obtained immediately afterward.


Preparation

It is important to discuss any known sensitivity to local anesthetics or iodine prior to this procedure. A physician should explain the procedure and the risks associated with contrast agents and ask the patient to sign an informed consent . If iodine contrast will be administered, the patient may be instructed not to eat before the exam. The timeframe of fasting may range from only 90 minutes prior to the exam up to the night before. There is no other preparation necessary.


Aftercare

The affected joint should be rested for approximately 12 hours following the procedure. The joint may be wrapped in an elastic bandage, and the patient should receive instructions on the care and changing of the bandage. Noises in the joint such as cracking or clicking are normal for a few days following arthrography. These noises are the result of liquid in the joints. Swelling may also occur and can be treated with application of ice or cold packs. A mild pain reliever can be used to lessen pain in the first few days. However, if any of these symptoms persist for more than a few days, patients are advised to contact their physician.


Risks

In some patients iodine can cause allergic reactions, ranging from mild nausea to severe cardiovascular or nervous system complications. Since the contrast dye is put into a joint, rather than into a vein, allergic reactions are rare. Facilities licensed to perform contrast exams should meet requirements for equipment, supplies, and staff training to handle a possible severe reaction. Infection or joint damage are possible, although not frequent, complications of arthrography.

Normal results

A normal arthrography exam will show proper placement of the dye or contrast medium throughout the joint structures, joint space, cartilage, and ligaments.


Abnormal results

The abnormal placement of dye may indicate rheumatoid arthritis, cysts, joint dislocation, tear of the rotator cuff, tears in the ligament, and other conditions. The entire lining of the joint becomes opaque from the technique, which allows the radiologist to see abnormalities in the intricate workings of the joint. In the case of recurrent shoulder dislocations, arthrography results can be used to evaluate damage. Patients with hip prostheses may receive arthrography to evaluate proper placement or function of their prostheses.


Resources

BOOKS

Juhl, John H., and Andrew B. Crummy. Paul and Juhl's Essentials of Radiologic Imaging. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1993.

ORGANIZATIONS

American College of Radiology. 1891 Preston White Drive, Reston, VA 22091. (800) 227-5463. http://www.acr.org .

Arthritis Foundation. 1300 W. Peachtree St., Atlanta, GA 30309. (800) 283-7800. http://www.arthritis.org .


Teresa Norris, RN

Lee A. Shratter, MD

User Contributions:

deb
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Jan 17, 2010 @ 11:11 am
Frequently, arthrography is ordered to determine the cause of unexplained joint pain.
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May 17, 2010 @ 12:00 am
this was very helpfull for me, I have been in a lot of pain for the passed 1 year and doctors cannot tell me was is wrong with my showder, hopefully with this they will be able to tell was wrong. I had three regular MRI done and they dont show anything so workers compensation tell me that there is nothing wrong with my showder but I have a lot of pain and Im not able to moved it forward or to the side. Thank You Helen
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Mar 9, 2011 @ 10:22 pm
I am finally getting mine done tomorrow and hopefully I can have my shoulder fixed. I have been through pain since last August and stupid workmans comp just doestn help me at all!!! hopefully this will tell them where the damage is done,
Bill
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Jun 10, 2011 @ 10:10 am
I've had this done, they actually pierce your rotator cuff to get the needle into the "joint space", where they inject the dye. This procedure is very uncomfortable and takes about 1/2 hour to complete. An anti-anxiety medicine is suggested. Not shockingly, most website don't talk about how truly uncomfortable this process is.
karen
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Jul 13, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
I had the procedure started today for an mra for my shoulder but the dr could not get into the joint. She got to the bursa but could not get further. Could this mean an abnormality in the joint..tendons ..or anything else?
Kaye Cooper
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Oct 6, 2011 @ 4:16 pm
I have recently had an MRArthrogram on my hip. Whilst it was mildly uncomfortable, the procedure was clearly described to me before commencement. I am concerned about the nausea, muscle discomfort in the leg and both hips the next day. Is this common? I was not told to rest following the procedure.
mike
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Mar 15, 2012 @ 8:20 pm
most painfull thing I have ever had in my life. I was screaming in agony. Almost pulled it out to stab the doctor in the eye. If I had to do it again i would ask for as much anasthesi as possible and pain meds
Abbie
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Mar 23, 2012 @ 10:22 pm
I just had this done today, and I agree. Most painful thing ever, and I've had my ACL replaced! The radiologist had to go in three times to get the contrast into the right space. I have two puncture marks on my shoulder which are already starting to bruise and I can't lift my own arm without help from the other hand. I hope they're right and this pain goes away in 24 hours! I wanted to jump off the table and run for it!
Jessica
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Apr 29, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
Two days ago had the arthrogram on my left knee and it's still sore and painful to the touch. I'm very active, gym rat, hiking, fishing, bicycling, etc... I did take it slow over the past 48 hours, but did not rest fully. Would like to hear from others on when their joint came back. Thanks in advance!
Walker
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Jun 22, 2012 @ 11:11 am
Not a painful procedure at all. If you're okay with getting shots, you'll be fine. It can be a lengthy process but overall very easy and not as bad as everyone says it is.
toni
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Jun 28, 2012 @ 11:23 pm
This procedure was painful in the hip ! I have had cortizone shots and they were just as painful but you have to bear them all. My leg was stiff after the procedure but it wore off as the day progressed. I am glad I had a designated driver because it would have been very difficult to drive and apply the brakes with no help from the sore left hip. I certainly hope the diagnoses helps to treat the pain that I thought was a hernia but is not.
ana
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Jul 19, 2012 @ 8:08 am
I had one on Monday in my shoulder. I'm petrified of injections and had worked myself up to the point I was shaking and had a panic attack before. There were 6 people in the room and one held my hand. Anesthetic does sting bu it passes quickly. I didn't feel the needle in my joint and had to look to know it was there. The pressure was quite painful and was highly unpleasant. Couldn't move my arm right for 3 days and needed help dressing but I have a very bad shoulder anyway. You will have 2 puncture marks as you have anesthetic.
Kori
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Sep 8, 2012 @ 12:12 pm
I had this procedure done on my hip on the 30th of August. I did not feel the needles due to the anesthetic but there was a lot of pressure and I was extremely anxious and uncomfortable throughout the entire procedure. They told me this procedure was not painful, that I would be able to work that night, and I would have to take an ibprophen at max. The procedure was done over a week ago and I am still in pain and still limping. Before I went in I would limp once in awhile after work or when I was tired and very seldomly had pain. It hurts to drive because it is my right leg, it hurts to sit, lay, walk, stand, everything hurts because it is a constant pain. I am also a bartender, and they knew that when they ordered the mri and told me I would be able to work. I worked friday and had to call in on Saturday because the pain was so bad. I worked Sunday and Monday and left crying at the end of both shifts. I did the same just last night, over a week later, and they prescribed my pain pills on Tuesday. I still have not heard anything of the results for this mri. This procedure is NOT easy and painless.
Jennifer
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Sep 13, 2012 @ 11:11 am
I just returned home from an arthrogram on my hip. I read many reviews about the procedure that had me terrified. However, I have to say my experience was not bad at all. Dr.Dunn at the Centers for Diadgostic Imaging in Greenwood, Indiana was wonderful. There was a little stinging for about three seconds from the Laddicane, but the actual injection of the dye was painless. Afterward, my hip felt somewhat heavy, but absolutely no pain. I was pleasantly surprised!

Good luck to all who read this. I am glad I can review with a smile. Thanks to CDI.
Steve
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Oct 6, 2012 @ 8:20 pm
Had this procedure on my shoulder yesterday. I asked for anxiety medication before it was started, but refused. Halfway through the procedure I passed out. It was the worst procedure I have ever experienced. I will never go through this again. I am still in pain now 24 hrs later. My shoulder feels heavy and on fire. I am only praying that the results will help in determining the horrible pain I have had in my shoulder for the last year.
Paige
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Oct 7, 2012 @ 10:10 am
I had this back in August on my knee. They were thinking I re-tore my medial meniscus, MCL Strain, or a torn/pulled hamstring. I went in was only suppose to take 30mins or less. It took them 1hr and 30mins at least. They had to inject me 3 different times with the same amount of fluid because they couldn't get the contrast to light up on the xray for my mri. He even called to see if his partner could come in but the other guy was off. Then they never even told the doctor about it so when I asked what could've caused it he's like caused what? And this was at a world renowned hospital. Yes its painful. They anaestetic burns when it first goes in. After that you'll feel the presence of needles but you wont actually feel them. After that I couldn't successfully bend my knee for 4 days. I had to goto school on crutches because I couldnt walk and bend my knee. You pee alot and the pain doesn't subside for like 3 days. Yes this is worth it but at times can be horrible. Too bad they never found anything wrong with my knee, now I'm going to get a second opinion.
miranda
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Oct 10, 2012 @ 8:20 pm
I had this done today and i thought it was kind of cool, getting to see on a screen them inject the dye into my hip. However, the procedure was done 8 and 1/2 hours ago and my hip is in a lot of pain. the doctors did not tell me to rest after. hoping this pain will go away soon.
joyce
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Oct 16, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
I had this procedure done on my hip yesterday and last night after the lidocaine wore off my hip became very stiff and quite a bit more painful than prior to the procedure. NO ONE told me to expect any problems after procedure or to take it easy. The procedure was somewhat painful but that was mild compared to the discomfort after but Iam used to pain I had an avulsion fracture of that hip a year and a half ago. I was at work slipped in water did the splits and tore the hamstring off the bone as well as fractured the bone when it tore off. Also had Lumbar fusion 4 years ago and still have a lot of back pain from that. I also have a mild form of Leukemia and today the day after the procedure I am running a fever, having abdominal cramps and nausea as well still having quite a bit of pain in the hip. Good luck to anyone having this procedure. I am glad that I had it done because I need to get a proper diagnosis just wish that they had been honest about it.
Monica
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Oct 26, 2012 @ 4:04 am
I had mri of the hip done today. I had read horror stories about this the previous night. However, my experience was total opposite. I don't have an issue with needles or anything but I too was scared out of my mind upon arriving. The local they gave of lidocaine didn't hurt and the actual injection into my hip joint I didn't feel a thing!!! Now after the actual mri, I tried getting up and walking and had to limp my way to my car. As seconds went by the worse it got. I went home tearing up my house like a crack head looking for pain pills. Forget the Tylenol, you will need something much stronger for the pain afterwards. I finally found something, laid down and went to sleep. When I woke up, I felt 90% better, but then the nausea started. I was nauseated for about an hour and then finally it all came up. Very uncomfortable, but if you can withstand needles and you have a great radiology doctor as I had, you shouldn't feel a thing during the actual injection. I understand everyone isn't so lucky. I'm glad I was. I almost hope they find something wrong, because it would validate the pain I'm having in my hip to have the procedure done and then it would also not have been done just for the heck of it! lol! Good luck!
Michelle
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Dec 11, 2012 @ 4:16 pm
I had the procedure done on my shoulder yesterday for a suspected rotator cuff tear. I've had pain for over a year that wakes me up several times each night. I was nervous, but the doctors and staff were great. The only actual pain came when the solution inflated inside my shoulder, but it subsided after 45 seconds or so. Now my shoulder is really tender, more so than before the procedure. I assume it will diminish over the next couple of days. If you want to get down to the source of your pain in order to feel better in the long run, it's worth it.
kara
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Dec 29, 2012 @ 11:11 am
I had an MR-Arthrogram yesterday of my right hip. i am a nurse and i know better than to read up on any procedure or diagnosis online. but of course i did and what a mistake that was! i was COMPLETELY freaked out about this arthrogram! They must have sensed my anxiety because they had a couple people in there with me, one of which was there to talk to me and hold my hand (im not much of a hand holder but i appreciated the offer). The radiologist explained everything to me, told me to expect a small amount of discomfort during the numbing lidocaine injection but that after that it should just be pressure. He said if i felt any pain to let him know becauase he could pinject more lidocaine, if needed. Someone was there talking me through it and I purposely wasnt looking at what he was doing or at the xray pic which helped me alot too. I really didnt feel much except a little bit of pressure. Within a few minutes he was done, i didnt even know the needle was out. So i got up and walked to the MRI but someone was in there and he was taking much longer than expected for some reason so i had to wait about 40 minutes to get in the MRI. i was in the MRI for about 10 minutes when they took me out an said that they think too much time had passed because of the guy ahead of me and they werent getting a clear picture with the injected material, that they need to inject again to get the best possible picture. so back to the fluoro room again for a second injection. this one i felt more pressure, but still nothing horrible. This time i was walked right into the machine and they started right away and they got a much better picture. I did drive home without a problem. I did walk around a bit after just to keep the joint loose as i felt that it was stiffening a little. maybe that was a mistake because it really ached overnight last night and i slept very little. a few hours after the injections i was a little nauseated too, but never got sick. i am sore today but just plan on taking it easy. thankfully its a saturday and im not working... it for sure would have been difficult to run around as i usually do at work. overall, i think it the skill of your radiologist doing the inection that makes or breaks your experience... my guy was awesome and i am thankful!
Greg
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Jan 20, 2013 @ 10:22 pm
Had this procedure performed Oct 31, 2012. I could not move my arm 12 hours later this led to surgery to clean out an infection. Has anyone else experienced this?
Jey-Jey
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Feb 14, 2013 @ 6:06 am
I had the procedure carried out on my wrist a month ago after breaking my wrist 8 years ago and never having it fixed after parents dint eel the need to take me to hospital however much pain i was in at the time but only being 14 i got on with things, but turns out I now need to have an operation on the joint and a metal plate fitted to the joint, I am back in hospital to find out what the MRI came back with. Fingers crossed it will be straight forward even tho they found an abnormailty in the joint. Has anyone else ever had to go through this??? Thanks
Ruth
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Apr 13, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
Hi I want to refer to 13 kori's email regarding her hip arthrogram. I had mine Monday this is Saturday and my hip
Feels very strange and very sore!! My dr can't explain to me what or why this has happened the results showed a healthy hip joint. Not so sure it is now rhough any advice please!!!
Teri
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Apr 25, 2013 @ 1:13 pm
I had a labral tear. The first MRI with Arth I had was not painful. After the procedure I was sore. I used Ibuprofen and ice which relieved the mild discomfort. I had a second MRI with Arth 3 days ago, and it was very painful. I was sweating, nauseated, and my ears were ringing. When I stood up, I passed out. 3 days post procedure, I'm hurting more than I was before. I'm scheduled for a second surgery due to sutures busting. I am a RN, sometimes ignorance is bliss. I would definite suggest eating before procedure. Call your Ortho DR, and get an anti-anxiety med. Lie if you have to, and tell the Dr your extremely anxious before procedures, and extreme anxiety in confined places. Good luck!
Clare
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Jun 15, 2013 @ 7:07 am
Shock horror - handicapped, pain after 3.5 years, as I write, a burning sensation in my wrist.

I had this procedure done in France, in my wrist to check the ligament in my thumb. Before the arthrography the radiologist asked me which ligament he was to test! Excrutiating pain for days afterwards. Could not brush my hair hold a folk. 10 days later still lots of pain. Saw radio and he said "Oh, someone had a complication this day". He went to check the records and told me it was me. He had injected iodine into the tendon (and maybe radial nerve).

I went back to the surgeon who proposed the surgery and he gave me an examination for free but now diagnosis. The hospital never replied to a letter of complaint (signed for delivery) - Polyclinique Aguilera, Biarritz, Dr Monteiro. The pain gradually got less but it never disappeared. I have a burning sensation in my wrist when ever I type or use my fingers. I had to stop studying my degree (I later finished) and have to stop writing every few minutes. I am handicapped, I can't type! My quality of life has reduced drastically.

I have seen numerous professionals including two neurologists, two surgeons, and GPs. No-one know what it is. It is ruining my life. Can anyone give me any advice? If not, I just want to make you aware that complications happen.

Best wishes

Clare McGowan
Kerry
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Jun 21, 2013 @ 8:08 am
After reading sum horror stories on here,by time i got to the hospital to have my shoulder arthogram,i was in such a panic and almost reduced to tears.there was 3 medical people in the room with me,i was absolutely petrified but id like to try n put someones mind at ease.for me it wasnt as bad as id expected,the initial injection of anesetic stung slightly,the injection of the dye was uncomfortable but not painful,i was aware of some presure but that was a pleasant relief.i must admit that when i went into the mri scanner straight after i was put in a terrible position which maximised my pain. The worst part of the whole thing was from a hour or two after the procedure,my shoulder was inflamed and i felt nauseus and slightly dizzy,i went straight home to bed and slept it off like u wud the flu,i generally felt achey and tired,all youve got to think is u will be one step closer to being pain free when they diagnose the problem.try not to worry,it wont be as bad as u think and u will get thru it. Gud luck xx
kelsta
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Jul 5, 2013 @ 10:10 am
due to my shoulder dislocating 3 times I was booked in for this procedure this morning. The doctor explained the procedure 1st the needle went into my shoulder which was a little bit uncomfortable then he said now as the air fills the area you will feel as if your shoulder is dislocating my god he was not joking it was absolutely horrendous instant sensation as if it had popped out of joint I stood up to walk to the ct scanner and nearly passed out. the pain is easing now and its 6 hours after having it, doctor explained it would probably take 10 hrs to disperse! that was the 1st time ive had it and the last never again :-(
Sheryl
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Jul 17, 2013 @ 2:02 am
I had this done on my shoulder yesterday and it was horrible! I had a regular MRI done in December and it was a traumatizing experience, as I am claustrophobic. I was stressing about this MR Arthrogram the past month. I did not know what to expect. My friends who have this done said they just got a regular shot in the arm and it was over in less than a minute.
I took a Xanax before my appointment because I was feeling stressed and anxious. They had me lie down on the xray table and they covered my face and neck with a sterile cloth so I couldn't see what they were doing. The doctor did not explain much of anything to me. He just told me that the initial shot was anesthesia and that it would sting, and it did a little bit. After that, he went in with another needle and I felt scraping in the joint. He would check his machine for something and go in again with the needle. He did this 4 or 5 times. I don't know why he had to go in so many times. Finally, he said he was going to inject the contrast and that my shoulder would feel full.
After he administered the contrast, I went to the bathroom to change out of the hospital gown. In about a minute, I felt blood rush to my head, and I was severely lightheaded and dizzy. I could barely put on my clothes. When I turned around to leave the bathroom, I almost fell over. I walked out and the nurse asked if I was okay, and I was not. I had blurred vision and heard buzzing in my ears. She assisted me to a chair, where I had trouble sitting down. She called another nurse in to check my vitals. I had high blood pressure but they suspected it was due to my nerves.
They said that reaction does not normally happen. They said it could have been a mixture of my stress and anxiety and a little reaction to the contrast and maybe a little reaction with the Xanax. With all of this going on, I started to get a migraine (I also get chronic migraines).
Suffice it to say that the MRI part of the procedure was also horrible, because of my claustrophobia and the migraine I had just got. The whole procedure took about two hours, because of all the setbacks.
I really hope I never have to go through this again.
Valla
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Aug 23, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
I had the MRA done on my hip. I have no issue with needles, the procedure was painless, and actually relieved my hip pain although only briefly. A slight sting for the lidocaine, then pressure/not really pain with the actual injection, just breathe slowly, and it's over before you know it! For the amount of time the numbing agent was effective, I was thrilled with the pain relief. Once the lidocaine wore off, the worse I felt was a heaviness in my hip/leg which made me slightly more unstable than usual. The MRA confirmed the suspected labral tears and FAI, femoral acetabular impingement, due to hip dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. With that very helpful information, I was able to schedule my second THR, total hip replacement, which was almost as easy as the first one 7 years ago. Unfortunately, I have persistent bursitis issues, a royal pain in the hip. This too shall pass.
Try going in with a positive attitude and good breathing technique (Yoga style works for me!). The value of the MRA should be appreciated. It can reveal and/or rule out issues which the standard MRI can not. For those of you suffering in pain for years with no definitive diagnosis, it could be, as it was for me, the tool which will finally provide the answers you seek and placement on the path to pain relief and healing.
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Sep 10, 2013 @ 8:20 pm
Had a MRI-A done on my right hip today. Honestly between the lidocaine and the actual injection it was no worse than a paper cut. Took me right in to get the MRI, put a set of headphones on me; asked me what channel I'd like to hear on Pandora and I actually fell asleep. It was a little sore afterwards but around 5 hours later and it is hurting a lot. Hopefully tomorrow it will go away. So overall the procedure was fine but the after effects are much worse. My hip is killing me right now.
Ang
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Oct 11, 2013 @ 1:13 pm
I had my left hip mri-a'd on Sept 30th. Pretty straight forward procedure, much like Roberts above.
However, progressively the pain has gotten worse - way worse than even before my diagnosis of osteoarthritis - very sore dull ache but coupled with excruciating sharp pains with each movement. I can barely put weight on the leg, it hurts to move it, and even lying down doesn't seem to relieve any of the pain. The doctor prescribed codeine which ive been taking with paracetamol and ibuprofen but it hasnt touched the pain.
ive been in tears for hours at the intensity of the soreness that seems to throb and at times a sensation that resembles the heavy feeling during the injection. it almost feels like the leg is too long and to put weight on it / straighten it would push the hip through the socket. it feels like i need my leg pulled out, cleaned and out back.
im in agony and dont know what to do, please help!
donna
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Oct 28, 2013 @ 12:12 pm
I am nurse I have had 5 years of injections , physical therapy, fluid drained from the joint . Not to mention a bursectomy. I have been told I have hip dysplasia , arthritis and need a hip replacement by 3 different doctors. I have suffered for years constant hip thigh butt pain and burning groin. Can't sleep and now insurance is yet again denying my replacement unil I have this arthrogram. I walk tipped to the side and was told now my right leg is 1 inch shorter than my left. Still workin 3 12 to 14 hour shifts and am just discouraged. Has anyone been denied this many times ? I'm tired of the pain and injection s and paying thousands. Just looking for some prayers and advice. No one understands but those who have been through this. Thanks for reading, apologies for the length.
Carson
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Dec 29, 2013 @ 10:10 am
Hello, I had this procedure (MRI with contrast fluid) done on my left shoulder about a year ago and only had minor pain. I had this procedure done to my right hip joint using the contrast fluid/dye 3 days ago. The procedure itself was mildly painful and I felt good until about 8 hours later. Then the pain set in. I had horrible excruciating pain in my hip and knee when I went to bed and the pain woke me up numerous times during the night. I was unable to put any weight on my leg when I woke up and I had a very intense excruciating and throbbing pain that was persistent. I took Tramadol and Advil for pain and it did nothing. I'm in day day 3 now and I still have significant pain and can not put weight on my leg, however, the pain is somewhat milder than the first day after the procedure. I had this done on Friday so I can not contact my doctor until Monday. I suggest asking your doctor for some good strong pain medicine to take after the procedure and don't have it done on Friday where you can not contact your doctor. "What don't kill you will make you stronger" so I've been told.
Luke
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Jan 31, 2014 @ 11:11 am
I've just had this done today on my shoulder. Was uncomfortable but fairly bare able. The nurses were great and the doctor very professional. After they inject the dye they then inject oxygen and that inflates the joint and makes it feel like it's dislocated again. It's now 7 hours since I had it done and when I move my shoulder I can hear all the liquid swishing around. Very strange. I wonder how long it will take till it's back to normal.
Denise
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Jun 9, 2014 @ 5:17 pm
I had this done on my right shoulder yesterday. The lidocaine injection was horribly painful. The contrast injection did not hurt. Today I cannot move my arm as the pain is so bad. I was sedated for the mri as I cannot go in that machine due to panic attacks. Never again.
Emily
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Jul 1, 2014 @ 6:18 pm
I just had one today. I'm only 15 years old. The doctors were surprised with me. They were saying how they often have grown men squirming and complaining about the pain. They said that I had an amazing pain threshold.
I honestly didn't not feel it much. I felt a slight inch when they put in the first injection, but the pinch was no worse than any other shot. I could feel him poking me, but nothing actually hurt. I was surprised when it was done because I hadn't really felt anything. The only thing that bothered me was the fact that the paper on my shoulder just covered my eyes so I couldn't see what he was doing. My arm is a little tense from the liquid being in there, but nothing hurts.
Jessie
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Jul 6, 2014 @ 8:08 am
I had this procedure done on my right hip 3 days ago. My Dr. was FANTASTIC. I don't do well with needles but didn't feel any pain, he gave me more pain medicine because he said I have more muscles in my hip than he was used to seeing and sometimes going through muscle is harder for the needle to penetrate. The only discomfort I had after was range of motion and a bit of stiffness. The nurse told me to use ibuprophen and ice packs for the next couple of days. I had no pain at all, no bruising, just a little bit of swelling. My hip actually feels better than it did when I went in. I am attributing that to the "cocktail" of dye they injected. I was told it had a bit of a steroid in it. If you have good nurses and a great Dr, you should be fine with this procedure.
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Jul 23, 2014 @ 1:13 pm
I have a laberal and a slap tear of my right shoulder
I have had X-rays , MRI , and attempted today to have a arthogram
Done however the doctor could not inject the contrast into the joint
She said she had done hundreds of them and have never been unable to do the test
She said a small amount may have gone in. He was using a ultrasound to guide her way between the joint
And could see the needle but it just wouldn't inject I could see her trying now my question is how can I proceed to get my repair done
23 years ago I had a torn rotator cuff and had it repaired if that helps with the reason why this test could not be done the constant dagger in my arm feeling
Is to much
martha
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Jul 25, 2014 @ 10:10 am
I had this procedure done for shoulder mri/contrast for the third time. Not sure why, but this was the first time I had a very bad recovery reaction. I was whoozy right after, though I denied it when asked. It was almost as though I had too much to drink and was embarrassed to admit it (and no, I didn't have anything to drink!). The dye injection procedure was completed by a Physician's Assistant (PA) and this made me uncomfortable as all the previous ones were adminstered by a physician with a nurse or PA in the room. There was no doctor anywhere supervising - not even one visible on the floor after. I was not given a choice either to have a doctor administer this. I always thought it was required that we be given a choice as to whether we are taken care of by a PA or an MD. The MRI took way longer than any of the others (about 90 minutes compared to prior 40 minutes). The MRI tech only checked in with me 3x's during this procedure (which is not much when you consider how long 90 minutes takes). During the MRI I began getting sudden sinus congestion that was pretty significant. I had to ask about whether I could swim competitive workouts or races the next day, and was told by the PA it may be better to wait 48 hrs. Other than this, I was not warned about nausea or whoozy symptoms and so it made me wonder when they asked as to whether there was just something wrong with me that I was feeling this way. After it was early eve, so I had dinner and one glass of wine and within 1 hr of that I was flat on my back with a massive headache, nausea, sinus congestion, and sweats. This lasted 3 days. The shoulder is still tight and sore. The PA should have outlined all this and provided me with an aftercare procedure that outlined these factors. People should not drink alcohol after considering this may worsen the effects. Instead, we should all be drinking massive amounts of replenishing fluids to flush the dye out of our system.
Eureka
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Jul 29, 2014 @ 2:14 pm
Pain Pain Pain ... I had a MRI with contrast dye into my left hip. Went in with no pain. 9 weeks later im still in pain Shock horror - handicapped, pain after 9 weeks!!!, as my pain dont stop. Doctor suggest treatment to get the contrast out of my body sent me for Ozone I can't walk on my left leg. Nobody can tell me why im in so much pain after MRI with contrast. Im crying for help. What can I do to stop my pain?
katie
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Aug 21, 2014 @ 2:14 pm
i am a diabete have kidney problem should I take this test . I can't take mri because of the kidneys. i'll let my kidney doctor know.
Irina
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Aug 30, 2014 @ 11:23 pm
That was nice to read all reviews, but so bad, what u can't to ask people, what happened afterwords?
I am 24 hours after hip MRI with dye, Horrible pain in my hip, plus fever start. Never again in my life!
So bad, what I didn't find this forum 48 hours ago.

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